The Demography of Corporations and Industries

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 2000 - Business & Economics - 490 pages
0 Reviews

Most analysts of corporations and industries adopt the focal perspective of a single prototypical organization. Many analysts also study corporations primarily in terms of their internal organizational structures or as complex systems of financial contracts. Glenn Carroll and Michael Hannan bring fresh insight to our understanding of corporations and the industries they comprise by looking beyond prototypical structures to focus on the range and diversity of organizations in their social and economic setting. The result is a rich rendering of analysis that portrays whole populations and communities of corporations.

The Demography of Corporations and Industries is the first book to present the demographic approach to organizational studies in its entirety. It examines the theory, models, methods, and data used in corporate demographic research. Carroll and Hannan explore the processes by which corporate populations change over time, including organizational founding, growth, decline, structural transformation, and mortality. They review and synthesize the major theoretical mechanisms of corporate demography, ranging from aging and size dependence to population segregation and density dependence. The book also explores some selected implications of corporate demography for public policy, including employment and regulation.

In this path-breaking book, Carroll and Hannan demonstrate why demographic research on corporations is important; describe how to conduct demographic research; specify fruitful areas of future research; and suggest how the demographic perspective can enrich the public discussion of issues surrounding the corporation in our constantly evolving industrial society. All researchers and analysts with an interest in this topic will find The Demography of Corporations and Industries an invaluable resource.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

About Organizations
3
12 Organizational Inertia and Change
5
13 Competitive Intensity
7
14 Global Competition
9
15 Historical Efficiency
11
16 Employment and Entrepreneurship
12
17 A Look Ahead
14
The Demographic Perspective
17
112 PopulationAge Interactions
243
113 Size Interactions
251
114 Multilevel Processes
253
Segregating Processes
261
121 Resource Partitioning
262
122 Research on Partitioning
269
123 SizeLocalized Competition
274
Organizational Processes
279

21 Demography of Business Organizations
18
22 Organizing Principles of Demography
25
23 Formal Demography and Population Studies
26
24 Demographic Explanation
28
25 The Demography of the Work Force
31
26 Internal Organizational Demography
32
Toward a Corporate Demography
35
31 Earlier Efforts
36
32 Retaining the Classical Structure
39
33 Making Demography Organizational
40
34 A Research Strategy
56
Forms and Populations
59
41 Population versus Form
60
42 Identity and Form
67
43 Codes
68
44 Organizational Forms
73
45 Organizational Populations
74
46 Systems of Forms
76
47 Implications for Corporate Demography
78
Methods of Corporate Demography
83
Observation Plans
85
51 Designs in Organizational Research
86
52 Tradeoffs in Observation Plans
89
53 Impact of Observation Plans
95
Analyzing Vital Rates
101
62 StochasticProcess Models
110
63 LifeTable Estimation
117
64 ConstantRate Models
127
Modeling Corporate Vital Rates
135
72 Dependence on Covariates
139
73 Note on Left Truncation
149
74 Comparing Designs by Simulation
150
75 Simulation Findings
155
Demographic Data Sources
163
81 Criteria for Evaluating Sources
164
82 Commonly Used Sources
167
83 Using Multiple Sources
185
84 Data Realities
188
Population Processes
191
Organizational Environments
193
91 Telephone Companies
194
92 Modeling Environmental
197
93 Environmental Imprinting
205
94 Imprinting in HighTechnology Firms
207
DensityDependent Processes I
213
101 Models of Population Growth
214
102 Corporate Density Dependence
216
103 Theory of DensityDependent Evolution
222
104 Interpreting Density Dependence
228
105 Weighted Density
232
106 Programmatic Issues
236
DensityDependent Processes II
239
111 Density Delay
240
AgeDependent Processes
281
131 Models of AgeDependent
282
132 AgeRelated Liabilities
288
133 Age and Growth Rates
290
134 Theories of Age Dependence
291
135 Core Assumptions
296
136 Liabilities of Newness and Adolescence
301
137 Liability of Senescence
303
138 Alignment Drift and Obsolescence
306
139 Liability of Obsolescence
309
Size Dependence
313
141 Size and Growth Rates
315
142 Age Size and Mortality
319
143 Automobile Manufacturing
322
144 Extending the Formalization
331
Initial Mobilizing
339
151 Organizing Activities
340
152 Theoretical Arguments
343
153 Automobile Preproducers
346
Organizational Transformation
357
161 Theory and Research
358
162 Structural Inertia
362
163 Transformation and Mortality
368
164 Innovation in Automobile Manufacturing
374
A PropertyBased Formalization of Inertia Theory
377
Selected Implications
381
Organization Theory
383
172 Alignment and Fitness
385
173 Adaptation and Selection
389
174 Speed and Efficiency of Change
393
175 Historical Efficiency and Competition
397
Regulation
401
181 Early Telephony
403
182 Interconnection Laws
404
183 The Kingsbury Commitment
406
184 Regulation and Deregulation in Banking
411
185 System Dynamics after Deregulation
414
186 Deregulation and Organizational Growth
418
Employment
423
191 Effects on Careers
424
192 Corporate Demography and Job Shifts
425
193 Job Creation and Dissolution
426
194 Corporate Demography on Individual Mobility
429
195 Employment Benefits and Social Welfare
432
196 Effects of Careers on Corporate Demography
437
Organizational Diversity
439
201 Beer and Wine Industries
440
202 Diversity Careers and Inequality
444
203 Toward a Community Ecology of Corporations
451
References
453
Index
481
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information