The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1914 - Byzantine Empire
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For this insight, I am grateful to Edward. - Goodreads
The writer is all over the place. - Goodreads
Some interesting sections and factoids throughout. - Goodreads
Don't spoil the ending for me. - Goodreads

Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume I

User Review  - Justin Evans - Goodreads

Let's be very clear about one thing: if you write English prose, and if you read a lot and care about English prose, you should read Gibbon. His sentences are perfect. Each is carefully weighted ... Read full review

Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume I

User Review  - Rlotz - Goodreads

It speaks to the genius of Gibbon, and the grandeur of this work, that there are no historians or social scientists who call themselves 'Gibbonians'. There are Marxists, Freudians, Foucaultians; there ... Read full review

Contents

I
vii
II
1
III
32
IV
65
V
91
VI
113
VII
138
VIII
181
IX
211
X
230
XI
256
XII
304
XIII
341
XIV
377
XV
425

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Page 86 - happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus. The vast extent of the Roman empire was governed by absolute power, under the guidance of virtue and wisdom. The armies were restrained by the firm but gentle
Page 32 - the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.
Page 191 - His manners were less pure, but his character was equally amiable with that of his father. Twenty-two acknowledged concubines, and a library of sixty-two thousand volumes, attested the variety of his inclinations; and from the productions which he left behind him, it appears that both the one and the other were designed for use rather than for ostentation.
Page 90 - world became a safe and dreary prison for his enemies. The slave of Imperial despotism, whether he was condemned to drag his gilded chain in Rome and the senate, or to wear out a life of exile on the barren rock of Seriphus or the frozen banks of the Danube, expected his fate in silent despair.
Page 371 - The outside of the edifice was encrusted with marble, and decorated with statues. The slopes of the vast concave, which formed the inside, were filled and surrounded with sixty or eighty rows of seats, of marble likewise, covered with cushions, and capable of receiving with ease above fourscore thousand spectators.
Page 64 - metaphor, was daily sinking below the old standard, and the Roman world was indeed peopled by a race of pigmies, when the fierce giants of the north broke in and mended the puny breed. They restored a manly spirit of freedom; and, after the revolution of ten centuries, freedom became the happy parent of taste and science.
Page 29 - But the temper, as well as knowledge, of a modern historian require a more sober and accurate language. He may impress a juster image of the greatness of Rome by observing that the empire was above two thousand miles in breadth, from the wall of Antoninus and the northern limits of Dacia to Mount Atlas and
Page 84 - and, after he was no more, regulated his own administration by the example and maxims of his predecessor. Their united reigns are possibly the only period of history in which the happiness of a great people was the sole object of government.
Page 55 - The public roads were accurately divided by milestones, and ran in a direct line from one city to another, with very little respect for the obstacles either of nature or private property. Mountains were perforated, and bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams.
Page 303 - Applying this authentic fact to the most correct tables of mortality, it evidently proves that above half the people of Alexandria had perished; and could we venture to extend the analogy to the other provinces, we might suspect that war, pestilence, and famine had consumed, in a few years, the moiety of the human species.

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