The Terrible Teague Bunch

Front Cover
W. W. Norton, Incorporated, Jan 1, 1980 - Fiction - 260 pages
2 Reviews

In 1905, in the Texas-Louisiana border country, four men meet at Mmc. Mattie Fouquet's Mahogany Parlor of Recreation, Diversion & Entertainment. Foyt is a cowboy who has outlived his era. Karnes is an oil-field rigger, sick of his man-killing job. Boudreaux, a Cajun lumberjack, is fed up with swamps and water moccasins. And Wheeler, an ex-soldier, has never been quite right since taking a rifle ball in the head.

During an evening of carousing, these four, good men at heart, agree on one thing: There's got to be an easier way to make a living. They decide to turn badmen and rob a train that is bringing money to a brand-new bank down at a place called Teague.

But the train's arrival is a month off and 150 miles away. In an overland odyssey that includes cattle rustling, blistering heat, and a head-on encounter with a tornado, the foursome meet up with the roughest obstacles and toughest luck that ever beset a bunch of well-intentioned badmen. In addition, there is the complication of a beautiful woman and her feisty half-breed daughter.

When the Teague Bunch arrives at the hold-up destination, all the bad luck they have previously endured is forgotten--because they find out, for a fact, just how bad their luck can get...

In a novel that is rousing, hilarious, and even poignant, Gary Jennings re-creates that peculiarly American turn-of-the-century time of grit, sweat, and swift change. Here is the real Old West; this is the way it was.

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Review: The Terrible Teague Bunch

User Review  - Kellysue Hornsby - Goodreads

Lots of fun, worth the read even if you are not into westerns. Read full review

Review: The Terrible Teague Bunch

User Review  - Molly - Goodreads

I liked this book, it was a sweet book about a couple of guys who had no plans and tried to rob a train but ended up in a whole nother direction. Read full review

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About the author (1980)

Born in Buena Vista, Va., Gary Jennings worked as an account executive in advertising and as managing editor of Dude and Gent magazines before becoming a full time writer. His early works were written for young adults, but he has since become well known as a writer of extensively researched, epic historical fiction. Jennings immerses himself in the culture of the period and locale to gain the background for his novels. Before writing Aztec (1980), Jennings lived in Mexico for 12 years and studied the Nahuatl language. The popularity of this novel resulted in the sequel, Aztec Autumn (1997). To give depth and flavor to his novel, The Journeyer (1984), Jennings followed a route to China, sometimes traveling by camel or elephant, in the manner of Marco Polo.

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