The Guardian: With a Biographical, Historical, and Critical Preface by the Rev. Rob. Lynam, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cowie, Low, 1826
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Contents

Character of Mr Charwellhis Economieson Freethinking
9
On DressLetter of Simon Sleek on that Subject
10
On Reproof GayThe Obsequium Catholicon and cures by it Pope
11
On Criticism and the Artifices of censorious Critics Steele
12
Account of the younger Sons of the Lizards
13
Account of two thoughtless young MenFashion of driving
14
Love Verseseasy Writing
15
On PoetrySongsSong Writing Philips
16
On illicit LoveStory of a French Knight Steele
17
On the Prospect of DeathPsalm by Sir Philip Sidney
18
On the Influence of ViceInsensibility to virtuous Sentiment Henry IV of France his Prayer before Battle Steele
19
On Duelling
20
Excellency and Superiority of the Scriptures
21
On a Country LifePastoral Poetry
22
On the same
23
Jack Lizards return from the Universityon Pedantry
24
On Lord Verulams History of Henry VII Budgell
25
All Women are LadiesLetter recommending a Wife to Sir Harry Lizard Steele
26
Grounds to expect a future State proved Berkeley
27
On Pastoral Poetry Steele
28
Essay on Laughterseveral Kinds of Laughters
29
On Pastoral Poetry
30
Various Schemes of Happiness Budgell
31
The Subject of Pastoral Poetry treated in an Allegory Steele
32
On the Merits of the Tragedy of CatoPrologue and Epilogue
33
Conversation on fine Gentlemen
34
The Pineal Gland discoveredVoyage through several Berkeley
35
Letter on Punning Birch
36
On the Tragedy of OthelloStory of Don Alpnzo Hughes
37
On pretty GentlemenLetter from a Gentlemanlike Man Steele
38
Observations on the Pineal Gland of a Freethinker Berkeley
39
On the Pastorals of Pope and Philips Pope
40
Censure of a Passage in the Examiner Steele
41
Gifts necessary to a Storyteller
42
Opinions on the Characters of Lucia and Marcia in Cato
43
Steele
52
Strictures on the Examiners Liberties witli the Character
53
Duties of ContentmentProduced by a Comparison of our Condi tion with that of othersStory illustrating this Steele
54
Importance of Christianity to Virtue Berkeley
55
56 Reproof and Reproach a Vision Parnell
56
Of CourtshipQuestions and Rules for Steele
57
Public SpiritLetter from a Hackney Authorfrom a Patriotic Drinkerfrom an ostentatious Lady Steele
58
Letters on Cato
59
On the various modes of reading Books i
61
Visit to Westminster SchoolUtility of public Seminaries Berkeley
62
Strictures on the ExaminerLucass Practical Christianity Steele
63
Petition of the Artificers of Esau Ringwood Susannah Howdye call and Hugh PounceLetter on Cato Steele
64
Improper Conduct at ChurchPoverty of the Clergy hurtful to Re ligion Steele
65
Common Fame a Vision Parnell
66
Fate of PoetsRecommendation of Tom DUrfey Addison
67
Letters on the Wife proposed to Sir Harry Lizard Steele
68
On Fenelons Demonstration of the Existence c of God Steele
69
Analogy between St Pauls and the Christian ChurchNarrowness of Freethinkers Berkeley
70
Observations on the Increase of LionsCharacter of a Lion Addison
71
On the Oxford TerravfiliusAbuse of his Office Steele
72
On the improper Interference of Parents in the Disposal of their ChildrenLetters on PassionPeevishnessShyness Steele
73
Extract from a Sermon of Bishop Beveridge
74
Extracts from the Sermons of two Divines
75
76 Endeavour to reconcile the Landed and Trading Interests
76
Shortsightedness of Critics Misers and Freethinkers Berkeley
77
Receipt to make an Epic Poem Pope
78
Miseries of the PoorRecommendation of their Case Steele
79
Strictures on the Examiner
80
Soliloquy of an Athenian LibertinePrayer of one who had been a Libertine Steele
81
Death and Character of Peer the Comedian
82
On Happinessobstructed by the Freethinkers Berkeley
83
Habits of Goffeehouse Oratorstwisting off Buttons Steele
84
Classical Descriptionsof the WarHorse in Job Young
86
On IntrigueImmorality of ServantsCharacter of a Miser Steele
87
Christian Ideasof the Being and Attributes of a God Berkeley
88

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Popular passages

Page 202 - Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain upon you, nor fields of offerings; for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with oil.
Page 233 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page xvi - THE Muse," disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme, In distant lands now waits a better time, Producing subjects worthy fame ; In happy climes, where, from the genial sun And virgin earth, such scenes ensue, The force of art by nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true ; In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules ; Where men shall not impose, for truth and sense, The pedantry
Page 244 - Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for the which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow; which came up in a night, and perished in a night. And should not I spare Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than six score thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand; and also much cattle...
Page 202 - Saul and Jonathan were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in their death they were not divided ; they were swifter than eagles, they were stronger than lions.
Page 340 - He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: he goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; neither turneth he back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, the glittering spear and the shield. He swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage : neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet. He saith among the trumpets, "Ha, ha!" and he smelleth the battle afar off, the thunder of the captains, and the shouting.
Page lx - What his mind could supply at call, or gather in one excursion, was all that he sought, and all that he gave. The dilatory caution of Pope enabled him to condense his sentiments, to multiply his images, and to accumulate all that study might produce, or chance might supply.
Page 346 - Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: they shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.
Page 166 - Tis not a set of features, or complexion, The tincture of a skin that I admire. Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover, Fades in his eye, and palls upon the sense.
Page lvii - Pope had likewise^ genius; a mind active, ambitious, and adventurous, always investigating, always aspiring; in its widest searches still longing to go forward, in its highest flights still wishing to be higher; always imagining something greater than it knows, always endeavouring more than it can do.

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