The Lady's Companion: Or, Sketches of Life, Manners and Morals at the Present Day (Google eBook)

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Lady
H.C. Peck & Theo. Bliss, 1854 - Women - 288 pages
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Page 93 - Stern Lawgiver! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through Thee, are fresh and strong.
Page 116 - Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul But I do love thee! and when I love thee not, Chaos is come again.
Page 276 - So saying, with dispatchful looks in haste She turns, on hospitable thoughts intent What choice to choose for delicacy best, What order, so contrived as not to mix Tastes, not well join'd, inelegant, but bring Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change...
Page 55 - ... bull or a bullfinch. She had wonderful powers of syncope ; though, it must be allowed, like most folks haunted with a despotic sense of their own genius, she now and then employed it a little out of place. Vanity, however, is a human weakness. For a philosopher, to his own satisfaction, has proved, that the peacock takes no pride in its own effulgent glories, but, all unconscious of their beauty, spreads them because it was ordained to do so ; and, after all, had Miss Daffy been philosophically...
Page 197 - I know it," replied the angel, " for I was myself the little sick boy -who went upon crutches. I know my flower well." And now the child altogether unclosed his eyes, and gazed into the bright, glorious countenance of the angel. and at the same moment they found themselves in the Paradise of God, where joy and blessedness for ever dwell. And God folded the dead child to His heart, and he received wings, like the other angel, and flew hand-in-hand with him.
Page 40 - Never mind," said the small man. " I was called the Poor Man's Friend. . And I can tell you, Mrs. Atkins, that I have paid pretty sharply for the vanity and vexation of the title." " That is, I suppose," answered the spirited little woman, " you wasn't his friend at all ? Only the name, like ? " "Listen to my story," said the little gentleman, again shifting himself among the holly leaves. "I was, when I was alive, and enjoying my proper stature, I was a man of exceeding wealth Rich indeed was I,...
Page 156 - BO hard-hearted as to refuse the contribution which it costs but little effort to bestow but it is not money, mere money, given and received, which will draw together in kindly union the hearts of the richer and the poorer classes amongst us. It is rather that interchange of words and deeds of kindness, which it might seem almost trivial to enumerate, but which speak more to the hearts of our fellow-men than hundreds given with a cold heart or a careless hand. Well has it been said by a writer...
Page 56 - Nay, we have known some veterans, blooming with a sprinkling of years over tyrannous fifty. And Miss Lillywhite was as jocund as she was handsome. It is said, there is no better preservative against the melancholy changes wrought by time than honey. We know not whether Miss Lillywhite was acquainted with the Egyptian truth : if not, she had unconsciously acted...
Page 56 - ... admired as samples, but never to be added to. Miss Lillywhite was an old schoolfellow of Mrs. Daffy's, and was passing the Christmas-time with her early friend and family. Now Angelina Daffy a pretty creature, with more goodness in her -than she...
Page 37 - ... to behold it in the most improved light. But pudding is not to be thus magnified. The table laid, Mrs. Atkins thought she would execute a few more stitches, filling up the time until Atkins and the children came. As Mrs. Atkins approached the mantel-piece, extending her fingers towards the thimble, the thimble of its own motion fell over upon its side, with one distinct prolonged sound, as from a silver bell ; Mrs. Atkins's thimble, by the way, being of no such precious metal, but of...

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