Tales by Three Brothers (Google eBook)

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Isbister, 1902 - 310 pages
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Page 288 - The slow sweet hours that bring us all things good, The slow sad hours that bring us all things ill, And all good things from evil, brought all, THE GOLDEN YEAR.
Page 287 - Alas ! how easily things go wrong ! A sigh too much, or a kiss too long ; And there follows a mist and a weeping rain, And life is never the same again.
Page 94 - not all that there ought to be in life. There had been others his acquaintances, his colleagues,, and his competitors who had led the same life, and one by one they had dropped away. Some there were, men older than himself, who still worked as he was working. Their...
Page 74 - It was a curious feeling, feverishness, perhaps, if a man without blood could be obnoxious to fever; intense nervousness, if nervousness could attach to a being that is nerveless. The Indians had shambled off afoot in the morning, and the place was lonely even to me, accustomed as I was now to the supreme isolation of my condition. About midday. I, for the first time since the drinking of the drug, left the Mission, and wandered aimlessly towards the river. The stream was running brimful, and...
Page 72 - Thy servant is waiting to do what Thou dost command." Again his voice became almost inaudible. Breathless with eagerness, I endeavoured to catch the murmured syllables, but it was useless. How I longed for the power, only for one moment, to tell the father that what he had heard in his sleep was true, to urge him to follow the clue thus given to him ! But It was futile wishing, and, weary and desperate, I turned into the open air again, as the father rose from his knees. I waited anxiously for the...
Page 38 - I braced myself, and, planting my feet firmly, threw my shoulders back, to try to shake the feelings off. No ; they only increased with great rapidity. The blood was bounding through my veins, and my spirits rose higher (for I am a sober, matterof-fact person ordinarily) than I ever knew them to in my life. I laughed aloud at myself, and jumped into the air with very joyfulness. Then the absurdity of my conduct struck me, and I proceeded gravely to remonstrate with myself, aloud. The next moment...
Page 32 - ... had, in reference to a 44-calibre Colt's which I carried, named me.) " He has not said that you are a hypocrite and that you know nothing. The medicine man cannot cure ? Huh ! The wild goat on the mountain, when shot with an arrow, knows what plant to eat to make the wounds close and the arrow fall.* The hurt beaver medicines himself. The wolf, when hunted, if given time to eat what leaves he chooses, makes himself invisible. The dog there has learned when to eat the grass to make him vomit....
Page 27 - ... hardy. His feet were cased in moccasins. The strong sunlight in his face made him droop his head forward, so that his chin rested on the heavy black cross on his breast, his eyes looking out at me from under his prominent brows. His head was partially bald, what hair he had being of a dark iron-gray. He suffered me to approach within a dozen paces, when as I dismounted, the Indians standing silently on one side, he came towards me with outstretched hands. Taking one of my hands in each of his,...
Page 57 - Mission, in the centre of the crescent of cabins, when i he five ponies, which wandered at will on the foot-hills, unhobbled, came walking in single file towards the river. I was directly in their line of march, and as the first one approached me a small dapple-grey, rat-like animal, with pink nose and ropy tail I reached out my hand to its forelock. The animal at once flung its head aside and avoided my touch. Could it have been only an accident? I hurried after it, and placed myself again...
Page 288 - For Love himself took part against himself To warn us off, and Duty loved of Love O this world's curse, -beloved but hated -came Like Death betwixt thy dear embrace and mine, And crying, ' Who is this ? behold thy bride,

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