American History Told by Contemporaries ..., Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Albert Bushnell Hart, John Gould Curtis
Macmillan, 1898 - United States
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Page 294 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 265 - Happy the man*, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire.
Page 116 - Then Samuel took a stone, and set it between Mizpeh and Shen, and called the name of it Eben-ezer, saying, Hitherto hath the Lord helped us.
Page 563 - The soldier flew, the sailor too, And scared almost to death, sir, Wore out their shoes to spread the news, And ran till out of breath, sir. Now up and down, throughout the town, Most frantic scenes were acted ; And some ran here and others there, Like men almost distracted. Some fire...
Page 234 - Seest thou a man diligent in his calling, he shall stand before kings, he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 155 - An Act for the further security of His Majesty's person and Government, and the succession of the Crown in the Heirs of the late Princess Sophia, being Protestants, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and his open and secret abettors...
Page 155 - Fines or Forfeitures due unto Us, fit Objects of Our Mercy, to pardon all such Offenders...
Page 403 - That all supplies to the Crown being free gifts of the people, it is unreasonable and inconsistent with the principles and spirit of the British Constitution, for the people of Great Britain to grant to His Majesty the property of the colonists.
Page 156 - New-York for our approbation or disallowance of the same as also duplicates thereof by the next conveyance and in case any or all of the said laws...
Page 403 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them but with their own consent, given personally or by their representatives.

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