Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel: Technology and Invention in the Middle Ages

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 1994 - History - 357 pages
26 Reviews
In this account of Europe's rise to world leadership in technology, Frances and Joseph Gies make use of recent scholarship to destroy two time-honored myths. Myth One: that Europe's leap forward occurred suddenly in the "Renaissance," following centuries of medieval stagnation. Not so, say the Gieses: Early modern technology and experimental science were direct outgrowths of the decisive innovations of medieval Europe, in the tools and techniques of agriculture, craft industry, metallurgy, building construction, navigation, and war. Myth Two: that Europe achieved its primacy through "Western" superiority. On the contrary, the authors report, many of Europe's most important inventions - the horse harness, the stirrup, the magnetic compass, cotton and silk cultivation and manufacture, papermaking, firearms, "Arabic" numerals - had their origins outside Europe, in China, India, and Islam. The Gieses show how Europe synthesized its own innovations - the three-field system, water power in industry, the full-rigged ship, the putting-out system - into a powerful new combination of technology, economics, and politics.
From the expansion of medieval man's capabilities, the voyage of Columbus with all its fateful consequences is seen as an inevitable product, while even the genius of Leonardo da Vinci emerges from the context of earlier and lesser-known dreamers and tinkerers.
Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel is illustrated with more than 90 photographs and drawings. It is a Split Main Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club.

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Review: Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel: Technology and Invention in the Middle Ages

User Review  - Michael Kruse - Goodreads

Excellent overview of technological change in Europe, 500-1500 CE Well written with an eye to why the technological changes were significant in Europe's cultural development. Read full review

Review: Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel: Technology and Invention in the Middle Ages

User Review  - H. Paul Honsinger - Goodreads

I read this book several years ago, and strongly recommend it to anyone with an interest in either medieval history or the history of technology. The thesis of this well-written book, which draws ... Read full review

Contents

Nimrods Tower Noahs Ark
1
The Triumphs and Failures of Ancient Technology
17
A D 500900
39
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Frances and Joseph Gies have been writing books about medieval history for thirty years. Together and separately, they are the authors of more than twenty books, including "Life in a Medieval City, Life in a Medieval Castle, Life in a Medieval Village, The Knight in History, " and "Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel." They live near Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Fiances and Joseph Gies have been writing books about medieval history for thirty years. Together and separately, they are the authors of more than twenty books, including "Life in a Medieval City, Life in a Medieval Castle, Life in a Medieval Village, The Knight in History, " and "Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel." They live near Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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