Etiquette for ladies and gentlemen (Google eBook)

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Contents

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VIII
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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Page 72 - A well-educated gentleman may not know many languages, may not be able to speak any but his own, may have read very few books. But whatever language he knows, he knows precisely; whatever word he pronounces, he pronounces rightly...
Page 87 - This may be called the whole art of riding, in one lesson. RIDING WITH LADIES. In riding with ladies, recollect that it is your duty to see them in their saddles before you mount. And the assistance they require must not be rendered by a groom; you must assist them yourself. ASSISTING A LADY TO MOUNT. The lady will place herself on the near side of the horse...
Page 87 - Remember that your left when in the saddle is called the near side, and your right the off side, and that you always mount on the near side. In doing this put your left foot in the stirrup, your left hand on the saddle, then, as you take a spring, throw your right leg over the animal's back. Remember, also, that the rule of the road, both in riding and driving, is, that you keep to the left, or near side in meeting; and to the right, or off side in passing.
Page 88 - He must then take her left hand in his right and offer his left hand as a step for her foot. He must lower this hand gently and allow her to reach the ground quietly without springing. A lady should not attempt to spring from the saddle. ENTERING A CARRIAGE. If you enter a carriage with a lady, let her first take her place on the seat facing the horses ; then sit opposite, and on no account beside her, unless you are her husband or other near relative. Enter a carriage so that your back is towards...
Page 127 - Or, The Language and Sentiment of Flowers, Including Floral Poetry, Original and Selected. Compiled and Edited by JOHN INGRAM. With 16 pages of Original Illustrations, printed in Colours by TERRY.
Page 109 - ... while one assists them to step from the bank. Let the ladies be comfortably seated, and their dresses arranged before starting. Be careful that you do not splash them, either on first putting the oar into the water or subsequently. If a friend is with you and going to row, always ask him which seat he prefers, and do not forget to ask him to row "stroke," which is always the seat of honor in the boat.
Page 72 - A welleducated gentleman may not know many languages, may not be able to speak any but his own, may have read very few books. But whatever language he knows, he knows precisely ; whatever word he pronounces, he pronounces rightly. Above all, he is learned in the peerage of words, knows the words of true descent and ancient blood, at a glance, from words of modern canaille...
Page 82 - ... within a week. The correct thing is to invite the stranger to dinner, and in that case it is well to ask some of your friends to meet him, as this is giving him a further introduction to society. Where this is impracticable, it may still be possible to show him some courtesy, such as inviting him to accompany you in a drive, or to the opera, or a concert, anything choice or interesting, in which case you will of course secure tickets beforehand for his acceptance.
Page 47 - ... on many subjects is soon acquired by diligent reading. One does not wish to hear a lady talk politics nor a smattering of science; but she should be able to understand and listen with interest when politics are discussed, and to appreciate, in some degree, the conversation of scientific men. Music. A well-bred lady of the present day is expected to know something of music besides merely playing a difficult piece. She should be able to discuss the merits of different styles of music, modestly...
Page 76 - Propriety is outraged when a man of sixty dresses like a youth of sixteen} when a man wears clothes showy in pattern and extreme in cut; when he dresses either above or below his station, or in a style inconsistent with his profession or calling; when his dress is not in keeping with the occasion on which it is worn. Other examples might be given, but these will suffice to show that to be dressed with propriety, that is, in harmony with one's self and one's surroundings, is to be well dressed. Morning...

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