The New Universal Letter Writer, Or, Complete Art of Polite Correspondence: Containing a Course of Interesting Letters on the Most Important, Instructive, and Entertaining Subjects ... To which is Added Dr. Johnson's Essay on Letter Writing; a Set of Complimental Cards... and a Minister's Advice to a Young Lady. To the Whole is Prefixed a Plain and Easy Grammar of the English Language... and Rules for Reading with Propriety (Google eBook)

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Published and sold by D. Hogan, 1818 - Letter writing - 251 pages
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Page 229 - When they become unfit for these purposes, and afford us pain instead of pleasure, instead of an aid become an incumbrance, and answer none of the intentions for which they were given, it is equally kind and benevolent that a way is provided by which we may get rid of them. Death is that way.
Page 45 - Remember that money is of a prolific generating nature. Money can beget money, and its offspring can beget more, and so on. Five shillings turned is six ; turned again it is seven and threepence ; and so on till it becomes a hundred pounds. The more there is of it, the more it produces every turning, so that the profits rise quicker and quicker. He that kills a breeding sow, destroys all her offspring to the thousandth generation. He that murders a crown, destroys all that it might have produced,...
Page 46 - In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality ; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both. Without industry and frugality nothing will do, and with them every thing. He that gets all he can honestly, and saves all he gets, ( necessary expenses excepted) will certainly become rich if that Being who governs the world, to whom all should look for a blessing on their honest endeavours,...
Page iv - IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners. By an Instructer." In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 200 - ... every other qualification, and to imagine that they shall find mankind ready to pay homage to their knowledge, and to crowd about them for instruction. They therefore step out from their cells into the open world, with all the confidence of authority and dignity of importance ; they look round about them at once with ignorance and...
Page 45 - He that is known to pay punctually and exactly to the time he promises, may at any time, and on any occasion, raise all the money his friends can spare. This is sometimes of great use.
Page 211 - Wherefore is light given to him that is in misery, And life unto the bitter in soul, Which long for death, but it cometh not, And dig for it more than for hid treasures; Which rejoice exceedingly, And are glad when they can find the grave?
Page 45 - He that murders a crown, destroys all that it might have produced, even scores of pounds. Remember, that six pounds a year is but a groat a day. For this little sum (which may be daily wasted either in time or expense unperceived) a man of credit may, on his own security, have the constant possession and use of an hundred pounds. So much in stock, briskly turned by an industrious man, produces great advantage. Remember this. saying, The good paymaster is lord of another man's purse.
Page 44 - Remember that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labour, and goes abroad or sits idle one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the only expense ; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides.
Page 226 - You formerly observed to me that nothing made a more ridiculous figure in a man's life than the disparity we often find in him sick and well ; thus one of an unfortunate constitution is perpetually exhibiting a miserable example of the weakness of his mind, and of his body, in their turns. I have had frequent opportunities of late to consider myself in these different views, and, I hope, have received some advantage by it, if what Waller says be true, that The soul's dark cottage, batter'd and decay'd,...

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