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Books Books 1 - 10 of 66 on Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention,....  
" Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. "
Letters to mothers - Page 145
by Lydia Howard Sigourney - 1838 - 240 pages
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Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind

Dugald Stewart - Psychology - 1802 - 587 pages
...MIND. 455 upon all the different fubjefts which may pafs unde our review. Nothing, in truth, has fuch a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extenfive and various reading, without reflexion. The activity and force of the mind are...
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Elements of the philosophy of the human mind, Volume 1

Dugald Stewart - Psychology and philosophy - 1821
...displaying themselves upon all the different subjects which may pass under our review Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. The activity and force of the mind are...
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Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volumes 1-2

Dugald Stewart - Philosophy of mind - 1822
...displaying themselves upon all the different subjects which iray pass under our review. Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the uit?!ectuH powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. The...
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An elementary treatise on logic: comprising the essential principles and ...

Hezekiah G. Ufford - Logic - 1823 - 192 pages
...manner. Q, What important remark has Mr. Stewart relative to method in reading ? A. " Nothing (says he) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection. The activity and force of the mind are...
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Elements of intellectual philosophy: designed as a textbook

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Intellect - 1827 - 504 pages
...are loo much inclined to pass on in a hurried and careless manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing (says Dugald Stewart) has such a tendency...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fully to understand...
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The Remains of Nathaniel Appleton Haven: With a Memoir of His Life

Nathaniel Appleton Haven - 1827 - 351 pages
...absolute idleness is not better, for every intellectual purpose, than indolent reading. " Nothing," says Stewart, " has such a tendency to weaken, not only...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." The divided attention we often give to...
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The Remains of Nathaniel Appleton Haven: With a Memoir of His Life by George ...

Nathaniel Appleton Haven - American literature - 1827 - 351 pages
...absolute idleness is not better, for every intellectual purpose, than indolent reading. " Nothing," says Stewart, " has such a tendency to weaken, not only...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." The divided attention we often give to...
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The American Reader

1828
...on in a hurried and careless manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing, (saysDugald Stuart) has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fully to understand...
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Elements of Intellectual Philosophy: Designed as a Text-book

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Intellect - 1828 - 576 pages
...careless manner. This is injurious to the memory. " Nothing (says Dugald Stewart) has such a tendency t weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading without reflection." Always make it a rule fall} to understand...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the human mind

Dugald Stewart - 1829
...displaying themselves upon all the different subjects which may pass under our review. Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers...invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection. .The activity and force of the mind are...
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