Sense and Sensibility, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. M. Dent, 1892 - 163 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
6
III
12
IV
17
V
23
VI
27
VII
31
VIII
35
XIV
69
XV
74
XVI
82
XVII
89
XVIII
94
XIX
99
XX
109
XXI
117

IX
39
X
45
XI
52
XII
56
XIII
62
XXII
126
XXIII
135
XXIV
143
XXV
149
XXVI
155

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Page xxi - It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda;" or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.
Page xix - You are now collecting your people delightfully, getting them exactly into such a spot as is the delight of my life. Three or four families in a country village is the very thing to work on...
Page xx - That young lady had a talent for describing the involvements, and feelings, and characters of ordinary life, which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with. The Big Bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going; but the exquisite touch, which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting, from the truth of the description and the sentiment, is denied to me.
Page 3 - He was not an ill-disposed young man, unless to be rather cold-hearted, and rather selfish, is to be ill-disposed ! but he was, in general, well respected ; for he conducted himself with propriety in the discharge of his ordinary duties.
Page xx - Upon the whole, the turn of this author's novels bears the same relation to that of the sentimental and romantic cast, that cornfields and cottages and meadows bear to the highly adorned grounds of a show mansion, or the rugged sublimities of a mountain landscape.
Page xv - ... where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies.
Page 94 - I am convinced," said Edward, "that you really feel all the delight in a fine prospect which you profess to feel. But, in return, your sister must allow me to feel no more than I profess. I like a fine prospect, but not on picturesque principles. I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles, or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farmhouse...
Page xxvi - ... a very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper. Those who can barely live, and who live perforce in, a very small, and generally very inferior society, may well be illiberal and cross.
Page xv - How long ago it is aunt, since we used to repeat the chronological order of the kings of England, with the dates of their accession, and most of the principal events of their reigns." "Yes," added the other; "and of the Roman emperors as low as Severus;1 besides a great deal of the Heathen Mythology, and all the Metals, Semi-Metals, Planets, and distinguished philosophers.
Page 81 - MARIANNE would have thought herself very inexcusable had she been able to sleep at all the first night after parting from Willoughby. She would have been ashamed to look her family in the face the next morning, had she not risen from her bed in more need of repose than when she lay down in it.

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