Kinderculture: The Corporate Construction Of Childhood, Second Edition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Westview Press, 2006 - Social Science - 388 pages
2 Reviews
Now updated with two new chapters and an extraordinary collection of photographs, this second edition of Paul Friedlander’s Rock and Roll: A Social History is a smash hit. The social force of rock and roll music leaps off the page as Paul Friedlander provides impressive insights based on hits from Johnny B. Goode to Smells Like Teen Spirit and beyond. In this musical journey, Friedlander offers the melodious strains and hard-edged riffs of Elvis, the Beatles, The Who, Dylan, Clapton, Hendrix, Motown, the San Francisco Beat, Punk, New Wave, rap, metal, 90’s grunge, plus file sharing, and much more. The book is written in a refreshing, captivating style that pulls the reader in, offering no less than a complete social and cultural history of rock and roll for students and general audiences alike. Friedlander writes, This book chronicles the first forty years of rock/pop music history. Picture the various musical styles as locations on a giant unfolding road map. As you open the map, you travel from place to place, stopping at each chapter to sample the artistry. Don’t forget to dress your imagination appropriately for this trip, because each genre is affected by the societal topography and climate that surround it. Enjoy your trip. We promise it will be a good one!
  

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Contents

III
vi
IV
15
V
25
VI
61
VII
67
VIII
75
IX
101
X
117
XV
185
XVI
205
XVII
243
XVIII
257
XIX
273
XX
293
XXI
313
XXII
333

XI
131
XII
145
XIII
155
XIV
169
XXIII
341
XXIV
351
XXV
359
Copyright

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Page vii - The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.
Page 217 - I'd never heard of Hendrix. Then someone said, 'You've got to see the guitar player with John Hammond.' I went straight across the street and saw him. Hendrix knew who I was and, that day, in front of my eyes, he burned me to death. I didn't even get my guitar out. H-bombs were going off, guided missiles were flying — I can't tell you the sounds he was getting out of his instrument. He was getting every sound I was ever to hear him get, right there in that room with a Stratocaster, a twin, a Maestro...
Page vii - n' roll smells phony and false. It is sung, played and written for the most part by cretinous goons and by means of its almost imbecilic reiteration, and sly. lewd, in plain fact, dirty lyrics • • • it manages to be the martial music of every sideburned delinquent on the face of the earth.
Page 96 - And in the end, The love you take Is equal to The love You make The drone behind it all was the note, C, right there in the soul of his brain.
Page 141 - Because something is happening here, but you don't know what it is, do you, Mister Jones? — Bob Dylan, Ballad of a Thin Man...
Page 44 - If I could find a white man who had the Negro sound and the Negro feel, I could make a billion dollars.
Page 31 - I felt then that if I could take, say, a Dixieland tune and drop the first and third beats, and accentuate the second and fourth, and add a beat the listeners could clap to as well as dance this would be what they were after.
Page vii - Sinatra later added that rock and roll was "the most brutal, ugly, desperate, vicious form of expression it has been my misfortune to hear.

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About the author (2006)

Dr. Paul Friedlander is Director of California State University, Chico Music Industry Program. He is author of the Encyclopedia Americana “Rock Music” entry, many book chapters and journal articles, and is past-president of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music/American Chapter. As a musician, he has sung with Pete Seeger’s Children’s Chorus at Carnegie Hall, played bluegrass banjo at southern music festivals, hit notes with New York homeboys The Chapters, played folk music in Moscow’s Gorki Park, and rock and rolled across the U.S.A.

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