Mao II: A Novel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, May 1, 1992 - Fiction - 256 pages
26 Reviews
"One of the most intelligent, grimly funny voices to comment on life in present-day America" (The New York Times), Don DeLillo presents an extraordinary new novel about words and images, novelists and terrorists, the mass mind and the arch-individualist. At the heart of the book is Bill Gray, a famous reclusive writer who escapes the failed novel he has been working on for many years and enters the world of political violence, a nightscape of Semtex explosives and hostages locked in basement rooms. Bill's dangerous passage leaves two people stranded: his brilliant, fixated assistant, Scott, and the strange young woman who is Scott's lover--and Bill's.
  

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Valuable truths and insights. - Goodreads
Writing as a form of effective protest is dead. - Goodreads
The funeral of Ayatollah Khomeini was gorgeous prose. - Goodreads
Existentialism before plot. - Goodreads
DeLillo's premise works. - Goodreads
Pregnant sentences before plot. - Goodreads

Review: Mao II

User Review  - Aidan Watson-Morris - Goodreads

I saw a photograph of a wedding conducted by Reverend Moon of the Unification Church and it was just lying around for months . . . a wedding in Seoul in a soft-drink warehouse, about 13,000 people ... Read full review

Review: Mao II

User Review  - Conor - Goodreads

DeLillo's finest work. No, seriously, it just might be. I'm looking forward to reading Underworld and Libra, and I have a hunch that The Names might be his underappreciated classic. But Mao II has it ... Read full review

Contents

PART
Chapter 1
IN BEIRUT
FOR THE BEST IN PAPERBACKS LOOK FOR THE FOR THE BEST IN PAPERBACKS LOOK FOR
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Don DeLillo published his first short story when he was twenty-three years old. He has since written twelve novels, including White Noise (1985) which won the National Book Award. It was followed by Libra (1988), his novel about the assassination of President Kennedy, and by Mao II, which won the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction.

In 1997, he published the bestselling Underworld, and in 1999 he was awarded the Jerusalem Prize, given to a writer whose work expresses the theme of the freedom of the individual in society; he was the first American author to receive it. He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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