A Dictionary of Modern English Usage

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 742 pages
12 Reviews
guide to precise phrases, grammar, and pronunciation can be key; it can even be admired. But beloved? Yet from its first appearance in 1926, Fowler's was just that. Henry Watson Fowler initially aimed his Dictionary of Modern English Usage, as he wrote to his publishers in 1911, at "the half-educated Englishman of literary proclivities who wants to know Can I say so-&-so?" He was of course obsessed with, in Swift's phrase, "proper words in their proper places." But having been a schoolmaster, Fowler knew that liberal doses of style, wit, and caprice would keep his manual off the shelf and in writers' hands. He also felt that description must accompany prescription, and that advocating pedantic "superstitions" and "fetishes" would be to no one's advantage. Adepts will have their favorite inconsequential entries--from burgle to brood, truffle to turgid. Would that we could quote them all, but we can't resist a couple.
  

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Review: A Dictionary of Modern English Usage

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

A dangerous book to consult. Many, many times I have picked it up to check something specific, only to find out, an instant later, that 30 minutes have passed, and I am still reading. James Patterson should write such riveting prose. Read full review

Review: A Dictionary of Modern English Usage

User Review  - John E. Branch Jr. - Goodreads

Learned in a way that'll seem arcane to some people nowadays, but for me this is priceless. Read full review

Contents

ey ie y in diminu
1
fail
59
False quantity
120
False scent
147
fellow
169
Feminine designations
175
Sed
226
foliote
238
GenteeUsm
373
Gerund
393
Grand compounds
502
Greek
517
Hackneyed phrases
540
half
546
Hangingup
563
Haziness
573

Foreign danger
276
For tore
293
Formal words
330
Friday
338
ful
344
Full atop
367
Hybrid derivatives
662
ibJe
668
4etel
679
ie
689
i
714
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

About the Editor:
Robert Burchfield was the Chief Editor of the OED from 1971-84. He was a Senior Research Fellow of St Peter's College Oxford from 1979-90 and is now an Emeritus Fellow of the College. His distinguished lexicographical career has included a number of key publications: The Oxford Dictionary of
English Etymology, 1966 (with C. T. Onions and G. W. S Friedrichsen), A Supplement to the OED, 1972-86 (with D. Donoghue and A. Timothy), The English Language, 1985, and The New Zealand Pocket Oxford Dictionary, 1986.

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