Britain and Poland 1939-1943: The Betrayed Ally

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 23, 1995 - History - 233 pages
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Poland was a problematic issue for the Big Powers throughout the Second World War. For Britain, Poland was a major stumbling block in British-Soviet relations as Polish-Soviet territorial disputes clashed with the needs of the British-Soviet-United States alliance. As the Polish government-in-exile attempted to obtain a guarantee of British support, and many thousands of Polish troops fought for the British cause, the perception grew that the Churchill government had a debt to pay. Ultimately, however, it was a debt which Britain could not discharge because of its dependence on Soviet participation in the war. In this book Anita Prazmowska looks at British policies from the point of view of wartime strategy, relating this to Polish government expectations and policies. She describes a tragic situation where Polish soldiers were trapped between the grandiose and unrealistic plans of their government and the harsh realities of a war which they fought with no prospect of a satisfactory outcome for them or their country.
  

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Contents

II
1
III
28
IV
54
V
82
VI
114
VII
139
VIII
166
IX
191
X
199
XI
217
XII
224
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About the author (1995)

Anita Prazmowska is Professor in International History at the London School of Economics, where she has taught since 1992. Her main fields of research interest lie in the Cold War; communism; contemporary history;Eastern Europe; fascism; and Poland.

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