An Atlas of World Affairs

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Taylor & Francis, Jul 6, 2007 - Political Science - 254 pages
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The economic, social and environmental systems of the world remain in turmoil. Recent years have seen possibly irrevocable change in the politics of Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America.

This entirely revised and updated 11th edition describes the people, factions, and events that have shaped the modern world from the Second World War to the present day. International issues and conflicts are placed in their geographical contexts through the integration of over one hundred maps. The political context provided for current events will be invaluable to all those uncertain about the changing map of Europe and Africa, conflicts in the Middle East, and the appearances in the headlines and on our television screens by al-Qaeda, Chechnya, the Taliban, Mercosur, Somaliland, Kosovo, AIDS, OPEC, and Schengenland. Critical new issues are covered including the war on terrorism, nuclear proliferation, European Union expansion, and the pressing environmental concerns faced by many sovereign states. This edition provides guidance through all these recent changes (and many more).

This book offers up-to-date coverage of all regions in great detail. It contains an objective and concise explanation of current events, combining maps with their geopolitical background. It provides a clear context for events in the news, covering the Middle East, Korea, China, the European Union, east Africa, and every other part of the world. Revised and in print since 1957, An Atlas of World Affairs continues to provide a valuable guide for the student, teacher, journalist and all those interested in current affairs and post-war political history.

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About the author (2007)

Andrew Boyd began his acquaintance with international affairs in 1946, when as a British liaison officer he attended the very first sessions of the United Nations (his other books include three about the UN). He travelled widely and reported on international affairs while writing on world affairs for The Economist for thirty-seven years.

Joshua Comenetz has used cartographic methods to visualize spatial data and explain the causes and effects of international conflicts, demographic change and natural disasters since 1990. As a consultant he has solved problems in areas ranging from political redistricting to ethnic and religious mapping, and he has taught international relations and geography at university level.

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