The Dominican Americans (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1998 - Social Science - 184 pages
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This profile of Dominican Americans closes a critical gap in information about the accomplishments of one of the largest immigrant groups in the United States. Beginning with a look at the historical background and the roots of native Dominicans, this book then carries the reader through the age-old romance of U.S. and Dominican relations. With great detail and clarity, the authors explain why the Dominicans left their land and came to the United States. The book includes discussions of education, health issues, drugs and violence, the visual and performing arts, popular music, faith, food, gender, and race. Most important, this book assesses how Dominicans have adapted to America, and highlights their losses and gains. The work concludes with an evaluation of Dominicans' achievements since their arrival as a group three decades ago and shows how they envision their continued participation in American life. Biographical profiles of many notable Dominican Americans such as artists, sports greats, musicians, lawyers, novelists, actors, and activists, highlight the text.

The authors have created a novel book as they are the first to examine Dominicans as an ethnic minority in the United States and highlight the community's trials and tribulations as it faces the challenge of survival in a economically competitive, politically complex, and culturally diverse society. Students and interested readers will be engaged by the economic and political ties that have attached Americans to Dominicans and Dominicans to Americans for approximately 150 years. While massive immigration of Dominicans to the United States began in the 1960s, a history of previous contact between the two nations has enabled the development of Dominicans as a significant component of the U.S. population. Readers will also understand the political and economic causes of Dominican emigration and the active role the United States government had in stimulating Dominican immigration to the United States. This book traces the advances of Dominicans toward political empowerment and summarizes the cultural expressions, the survival strategies, and the overall adaptation of Dominicans to American life.

  

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Contents

USDominican Relations An AgeOld Romance
9
Dominican Familiarity with the United States
10
American Ideas and the Birth of the Dominican State
11
American Agents in Santo Domingo
14
American Idylls in the Dominican Land
17
Bringing Dominicans into the Union
19
Dominican Blackness and Frederick Douglass
22
Dominicans in an American Protectorate
23
Voluntary Associations
80
Membership and Participation
82
Social Function
84
Professionals and Advocacy
85
Education
86
Health Issues
91
Drugs and Violece
93
Political Empowerment
96

19161924
26
Dominicans Americanized
28
The Dominican Exodus
29
Escape from the Native Land
33
Who Are the Immigrants?
34
The Making of a Migratory Movement
36
Restructuring the Dominican Economy
37
Stability Family Planning and Emigration
39
Economic Growth and Surplus Population
44
Modernization and Import Substitution
45
The CattleAgriculture Sector
47
Accumulation and Crisis
53
The Great Escape
59
Dominicans in the United States The Rise of a Community
61
Prior to Migration
64
Occupations and Earnings
67
Employment Unemployment Outcomes
70
Education and Residential Patterns
72
Dominicans in Business
74
Who Are the Business Owners?
77
Assessing the Business Sector
78
Forging a DominicanAmerican Culture
101
The Nineteenth Century
104
The Early Twentieth Century
105
Individual Dominicans in the United States
107
Dominicans in the United States as Exiles
109
DominicanAmerican Literature
111
Visual Arts
121
Performing Arts
125
Popular Arts
133
Faith and Food
138
Gender
141
Race
143
Diasporic Identity
145
The Future of Dominican Americans
149
The AntiImmigrant Wave
152
The Tension of Here and There
156
The Obstacle of Race
157
Hoping for the Best
158
Bibliography
161
Index
173
Copyright

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Page 165 - Littlefield. Goris-Rosario, Anneris Altagracia. 1994. "The Role of the Ethnic Community and the Workplace in the Integration of Immigrants: A Case Study of Dominicans in New York City.

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About the author (1998)

SILVIO TORRES-SAILLANT is Assistant Professor of English at Hostos Community College, CUNY, and the Director of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute at The City College of New York.RAMONA HERNANDEZ is Assistant Professor in the Latino Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and a Research Associate in the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute.

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