1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West

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Hyperion Books, Aug 16, 2006 - Religion - 336 pages
101 Reviews
Now in trade paperback, a gripping exploration of the fall of Constantinople and its connection to the world we live in today

The fall of Constantinople in 1453 signaled a shift in history, and the end of the Byzantium Empire. Roger Crowley's readable and comprehensive account of the battle between Mehmed II, sultan of the Ottoman Empire, and Constantine XI, the 57th emperor of Byzantium, illuminates the period in history that was a precursor to the current jihad between the West and the Middle East.

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Decent background, competent but not inspired prose. - Goodreads
I also felt like the writing was dated stylistically. - Goodreads
The writing is both clear and gripping. - Goodreads
Reads like a novel and is a real page turner. - Goodreads
But the writer does. - Goodreads

Review: 1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West

User Review  - Bryan Rahija - Goodreads

I picked this book up on a lark at a bookstore to prepare for a trip to Turkey. Definitely wasn't expecting it but this was one of the better books I've read in a while. Crowley brings a truly epic ... Read full review

Review: 1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West

User Review  - Shakespearesgirl - Goodreads

Well, I finally finished it. And it was . . . I can't call it a bad book, because it did all the things a history book is supposed to do. Crowley wrote with great competency and authority on the ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Roger Crowley was born in England and studied English at Cambridge University. After university, he taught English in Istanbul where he developed his interest in the city and its history. He has traveled widely throughout Turkey, including three journeys on foot across Western Anatolia, and has a working knowledge of Turkish. For the past fifteen years he has worked as a successful educational publisher for Nelson Thornes in Cheltenham, England.

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