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Books Books 1 - 10 of 117 on From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving....  
" From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be — That no life lives forever, That dead men rise up never, That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. "
Poems and Ballads - Page 197
by Algernon Charles Swinburne - 1868 - 344 pages
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Fraser's Magazine, Volume 74

Thomas Carlyle - Authors - 1866
...sweeter Than love's, who fears to greet her, To men that mix and meet her From many times and lands. From too much love of living, From hope and fear set...That no life lives for ever ; That dead men rise up ncver ; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. This is from Before Parting : I know...
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The New Jersey Magazine, Volume 1

Allen Lee Bassett - Literary Collections - 1867
...and, •las I of a dark and terrible philosophy, the author has condensed the entirety of his belief: "From too much love of living, From hope and fear...thanksgiving, Whatever gods may be : That no life lives forever, That dead men rise up never, That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. " Then...
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Fraser's Magazine, Volume 5; Volume 85

Thomas Carlyle - Authors - 1872
...upon St. Paul's aspirations for immortality, and others may prefer, in the words of a modern poet, To thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever Gods may be, That no life lives for ever, That (load men rise up never, Thiit even tlio weariest river AVinds somewhere safe to sea ! There are times...
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English Language and Literary Criticism: English poetry

James Baldwin - English language - 1882
...fair as roses, His beauty clouds and closes; And well though lone reposes, In the end it is not well. We are not sure of sorrow, And joy was never sure;...thanksgiving Whatever gods may be— That no life lives forever, That dead men rise up never, That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. Then...
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Wild Rose, Volume 3

John Hill (novelist.) - 1882
...destruction of mine — voyons ! — T like her almost as if she were a man — curious.' CHAPTER X. ' From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free.' ' These stately stars, in their now shining faces, "With sinless Sleep, and Silence, "Wisdom's mother,...
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Poems and Ballads

Algernon Charles Swinburne - 1883 - 338 pages
...Dead dreams of days forsaken Blind buds that snows have shaken, Wild leaves that winds have taker . Red strays of ruined springs. We are not sure of sorrow,...living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgivin-* Whatever gods may be That no life lives for ever ; That dead men rise up never ; That...
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The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 50

1885
...seven centuries, the voice of Swinburne rises responsively to Omar Khayyam, but with a sadder tone : " From too much love of living, From hope and fear set...thanksgiving, Whatever gods may be That no life lives forever ; That dead men rise up never ; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea."...
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George Eliot's Poetry: And Other Studies

Rose Elizabeth Cleveland - Middle Ages - 1885 - 191 pages
...mournfulest negatives he arrives at certainties which put some meaning into his luxury of sound. " From too much love of living, From hope and fear set...free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods there be, That no life lives forever, That dead men rise up never, That even the weariest river Winds...
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In Memoriam: Edgar Kelsey Apgar : Obiit A.D. 1885

Biography & Autobiography - 1886 - 145 pages
..."Ode to Victor Hugo," "The Nayades," and "Garden of Proserpine." The closing lines of this last — "From too much love of living, From hope and fear...free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods there be That no life lives forever ; That dead men rise up never; That even the weariest river Winds...
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The poets of the second half of the reign. The writers of vers de société

Henry Fitz Randolph - Ballads, English - 1887
...thither, And all disastrous things ; Dead dreams of days forsaken, Blind buds that snows have shaken, Wild leaves that winds have taken, Red strays of ruined...thanksgiving Whatever gods may be That no life lives forever; That dead men rise up never; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. Then...
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