Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

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Frog Books, 2003 - Humor - 128 pages
22 Reviews
A mention of flatulence might conjure up images of bratty high school boys or lowbrow comics. But one of the most eloquent—and least expected—commentators on the subject is Benjamin Franklin. The writings in Fart Proudly reveal the rogue who lived peaceably within the philosopher and statesman. Included are "The Letter to a Royal Academy"; "On Choosing a Mistress"; "Rules on Making Oneself Disagreeable"; and other jibes. Franklin's irrepressible wit found an outlet in perpetrating hoaxes, attacking marriage and other sacred cows, and skewering the English Parliament. Reminding us of the humorous, irreverent side of this American icon, these essays endure as both hilarious satire and a timely reminder of the importance of a free press.
  

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Review: Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

User Review  - Johnny Saldana - Goodreads

Well written and well done. I believe Franklin himself would be proud. Read full review

Review: Fart Proudly: Writings of Benjamin Franklin You Never Read in School

User Review  - Renee - Goodreads

Franklin gets five stars. Japikse gets one. Maybe a half. Okay, one. He gets credit for collating these gems. But he comes off like a . . . like an armpit fart at the end. One should have the good ... Read full review

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Copyright

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About the author (2003)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

Carl Japikse is an author, editor, and teacher who lives with his wife Rose in the north Georgia mountains. He is best known for his books of humor and the development of the mind.

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