The Dramatic Works and Poems of James Shirley, Now First Collected: The lady of pleasure. The royal master. The duke's mistress. The doubtful heir. St. Patrick for Ireland. The constant maid. The humorous courtier (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1833
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - As to the court of pleasure, all your gallants And ladies, thither bound by a subpoena Of Venus and small Cupid's high displeasure : 'Tis but the Family of Love, translated Into more costly sin...
Page 10 - Tis but the Family of Love, translated Into more costly sin ; there was a play on't ; And had the poet not been...
Page 7 - To think so, and the pleasure of a kingdom : While your own will commanded what should move Delights, your husband's love and power joined To give your life more harmony. You...
Page 10 - You look not through the subtilty of cards, And mysteries of dice, nor can you save Charge with the box, buy petticoats and pearls, And keep your family by the precious income ; Nor do I wish you should : my poorest servant Shall not upbraid my tables, nor his hire Purchas'd beneath my honour : you make play Not a pastime but a tyranny, and vex Yourself and my estate by 't.
Page 8 - F th" state, but with this lose not your memory Of being my wife. I shall be studious, Madam, to give the dignity of your birth All the best ornaments which become my fortune...
Page 530 - Covrtier, a Comedy, as it hath been presented with good applause at the private house in Drury-Lane.
Page 29 - Stew. More suitable to the town and time ; we keep No Lent here, nor is't my lady's pleasure you Should fast from anything you have a mind to ; Unless it be your learning, which she would have you Forget with all convenient speed that may be, For the credit of your noble family. The case is altered since we lived i' the country ; We do not. now invite the poor o...
Page 29 - We do not [now] invite the poor o' the parish To dinner, keep a table for the tenants ; Our kitchen does not smell of beef; the cellar Defies the price of malt and hops ; the footmen And coach-drivers may be drunk like gentlemen, With wine ; nor will three...
Page 30 - ... content your friends ; you shall Want nothing, if you can be proud, and spend it For my lady's honour. Here are a hundred Pieces, will serve you till you have new clothes ; I will present you with a nag of mine, Poor tender of my service, please you accept ; My lady's smile more than rewards me for it. I must provide fit servants to attend you, Monsieurs, for horse and foot. Fred. I shall submit, If this be my aunt's pleasure, and be ruled ; My eyes are opened with this purse already, And sack...
Page 302 - Live thou, oh live ! And if thou hast a tear, when I am dead, But drop it to my memory, it shall, More precious than embalming, dwell upon me, And keep my ashes pure ; my spirit shall, At the same instant, in some innocent shape, Descend upon that earth thou hast bedew'd, And kissing the bright tribute of thy eye, Shall after wait like thy good angel on thee.

Bibliographic information