Lights & Shadows of American Life, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Mary Russell Mitford
H. Colburn & R. Bentley, 1832 - Short stories, English
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Page 216 - In the first rank of these did Zimri stand ;* A man so various, that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts, and nothing long; But, in the course of one revolving moon, Was chemist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 218 - ... cloak, or pelisse hat, cap, helm, or turban the sitting cross-legged or on a chair the eating dinner with a fork or the fingers. This nonsense of the dancing and howling Dervishes at Scutari, is very much the same nonsense that many of my readers must have seen at Lebanon and Niskayuna among our Shakers. It is a kind of dancing by way of religious exercises, at first heavy, and then becoming more and more violent. The chief difference is, that the Turks, when once excited, have more...
Page 15 - IT was a winter's evening, and fast came down the snow, And keenly o'er the wide heath the bitter blast did blow...
Page 309 - ... hats. Destiny had decreed he should follow this trade, and nature had provided him a head on purpose. It was as flat as a pancake. In the long winter evenings, it was his pleasure to sit by the fire-side, and tell enormous stories to groups of horror-struck listeners. I never knew a man that had been so often robbed on Hounslow Heath, or had seen so many ghosts in his day, as master Tim Canty. Peace to his ashes he is dead, and if report is to be credited, is sometimes seen on moon-light...
Page 209 - To his own pleasures and his patron's pride : From such apostles, O ye mitred heads, Preserve the church ! and lay not careless hands On skulls that cannot teach, and will not learn.
Page 204 - It had sudden and most ludicrous breaks from a high hoarse croak, down at once into a shrill squeak ; so that in spite of grace and figure, and a tolerable conception of his author, he was fairly laughed down. I did my best to sustain him, but I was almost alone in the good-natured attempt. Two days after, turning short round the transept of the Abbey church, I came full upon Major Egerton, who was standing alone, with a listless and melancholy air. " Major," said I then correcting myself ...
Page 205 - I'll to my old trade, and enlist as a soldier. In the meanwhile lend me a guinea for old acquaintance sake. I did so, and saw no more of him at Bath. I soon after left England for the continent. At Dover, before the quarters of some general officer, I saw the ci-devant Major Egerton on duty as a sentinel a private soldier. I did not speak to him, nor did he seem to observe me ; but I was sure of my man. The studies and the amusements of Paris, during the winter, and the excitement of travel for...
Page 210 - Pacha's dinner-table, eating roast lamb and rice with my fingers. Meanwhile, in the letterpress I go down to posterity as the " author's intelligent friend," his " amusing friend," and even his
Page 303 - Cobus little Cobus, I say, lived on the banks of Sawmill River, where it winds close under the brow of the Raven Rock, an enormous precipice jutting out of the side of the famous Buttermilk Hill, of which the reader has doubtless often heard. It was a rude, romantic spot, distant from the high road, which, however> could be seen winding up the hill about three miles off. His nearest neighbours were at the same distance, and he seldom saw company except at night, when the fox and the weasel sometimes...
Page 206 - ... of some general officer, I saw the ci-devant Major Egerton on duty as a sentinel a private soldier. I did not speak to him nor did he seem to observe me ; but I was sure of my man. The studies and the amusements of Paris, during the winter, and the excitement of travel for the rest of the year, soon put my unlucky major out of my head ; except that now and then when I fell into a narrative mood, I would tell his story to some of my young countrymen, generally ending it with a Johnsonian morality...

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