Characters of Shakespear's plays (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Dent, 1906 - 268 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 94 - Ye elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes and groves, And ye that on the sands with printless foot Do chase the ebbing Neptune and do fly him When he comes back ; you demi-puppets that By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make, Whereof the ewe not bites, and you whose pastime Is to make midnight mushrooms...
Page 186 - This many summers in a sea of glory; But far beyond my depth : my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me, Weary, and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream, that must for ever hide me.
Page 26 - O, you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements, To towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, Your infants in your arms, and there have sat The live-long day, with patient expectation, To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome...
Page 174 - And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
Page 120 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars...
Page xxi - Dis's waggon! daffodils That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath...
Page 271 - For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings, That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
Page 132 - How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? LEAR. You do me wrong to take me out o' the grave; thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears do scald like molten lead.
Page 91 - em. Cal. I must eat my dinner. This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother, Which thou tak'st from me. When thou earnest first, Thou strok'dst me, and mad'st much of me ; wouldst give me Water with berries in't ; and teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the less, That burn by day and night : and then I lov'd thee, And show'd thee all the qualities o...
Page 174 - All murder'd for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court; and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...

Bibliographic information