Rural economy: in its relations with chemistry, physics, and meteorology : or, Chemistry applied to agriculture (Google eBook)

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O. Judd, 1865 - Agricultural chemistry - 507 pages
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Page 482 - This result is not only remarkable in so far as it seems to indicate that upon every parallel of latitude, at all elevations above the level of the sea, the same plant receives in the course of its existence an equal quantity of heat, but it may find its direct application by enabling us to foresee the possibility of acclimating a vegetable in a country, the mean temperature of the several months of which is known.
Page 183 - To thrive, the coffee-plant requires frequent rains up to the time of flowering. The fruit bears a strong resemblance to a small cherry, and is ripe when it becomes of a red color, and the pulp is soft and very sweet. As the berries never ripen simultaneously, the coffee harvest takes place at different times, each requiring at least three visits made at intervals of from five to six days. A negro will gather from ten to twelve gallons of fruit in the course of a day. Two...
Page 482 - ... shorter as the mean temperature of the cycle itself is lower or higher. In other words, the duration of the vegetation appears to be in the inverse ratio of the mean temperature ; so that if we multiply the number of days during which a given plant grows in different climates, by the mean temperature of each we obtain numbers that are very nearly equal.
Page 374 - ... are constantly withdrawn by successive harvests from another part. Lands enriched by rivers alone permit of a total and continued export of their produce without exhaustion. Such are the fields fertilized by the inundations of the Nile ; and it is difficult to form an idea of the prodigious quantities of phosphoric acid, magnesia and potash, which in a succession of ages have passed out of Egypt with her incessant exports of corn.
Page 4 - In the justice of this vital objection, most practical agriculturists who have used them to any extent, will readily concur ; and it will not be uninteresting to the reader to learn that there is reason to believe that it will henceforth be effectually obviated by the use of a very simple and convenient apparatus, devised by Mr. Smith of Deanston, a zealous and able friend of agriculture, who at the Highland Society's meeting at Glasgow in autumn last, explained the details of his contrivance ; and...
Page 2 - ... agricultural commentator ; but on this head the distinguished author is so thoroughly explanatory and judicious, that nothing is left for the Editor but to approve, to acquiesce, and to recommend him with admiring confidence to the patient consideration and study of the intelligent inquirer. At page 237 the subject of manures is taken up, and discussed with characteristic minuteness through many succeeding pages. It may perhaps be objected, that the various theories respecting the origin, nature,...
Page 2 - At the same time the results of the writer's researches, as well as the means and processes by which these results were obtained, are displayed with such absolute perspicuity as to be intelligible and instructive to every agricultural inquirer, however superficial his previous acquaintance may be with the details of chemical science. Nothing from the pen of the Editor could throw additional light upon the Author's...
Page 1 - Bouissangault's title to consideration is recognised wherever letters and civilization have extended their influence. Surely, the collected and carefully recorded experience of such a man must have value in the estimation of every educated mind, and cannot fail to be especially welcome to that class of readers who are professionally engaged in the practical application of that noble science which his labors have contributed to illustrate and advance. The...
Page 66 - The sap of the birch-tree reddens turnsole intensely ; it is colorless, and has a sweet taste. The water which forms the greater part of it, holds in solution sugar, extractive matter, acetate of lime, acetate of alumina, and acetate of potash. When properly concentrated by evaporation, it ferments on the addition of yeast, and then yields alcohol on distillation. The presence of the acetate of alumina may appear extraordinary in this sap, for this reason, that alumina has not yet been discovered...
Page 505 - It may be ~readily imagined, that in the course of these four years an immense quantity of timber had been cut down, not only for the construction of machinery and of houses, but as fuel, and for the manufacture of charcoal. For facility of transport, the felling . had principally gone on upon the table-land of San Jorge. But the clearing had scarcely been effected two years before it was perceived that the quantity of water for the supply of the machinery had notably diminished. The volume of water...

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