Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot-blacks (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Henry T. Coates, 1895 - Abandoned children - 296 pages
0 Reviews
Story illustrates the "experiences of the friendless and vagrant children" of New York City.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
9
II
19
III
29
IV
39
V
49
VI
62
VII
72
VIII
84
XV
160
XVI
171
XVII
182
XVIII
194
XIX
205
XX
217
XXI
229
XXII
241

IX
93
X
107
XI
118
XII
130
XIII
140
XIV
149
XXIII
253
XXIV
263
XXV
273
XXVI
281
XXVII
290

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 299 - The borrower must return this item on or bef< the last date stamped below. If another u places a recall for this item, the borrower be notified of the need for an earlier return.
Page 122 - I hope, my lad, you will prosper and rise in the world. You know, in this free country, poverty in early life is no bar to a man's advancement.
Page 15 - Our ragged hero wasn'ta model boy in all respects. I am afraid he swore sometimes, and now and then he played tricks upon unsophisticated boys from the country, or gave a wrong direction to honest old gentlemen unused to the city.
Page 294 - somebody's stole my Washington coat and Napoleon pants. Maybe it's an agent of Barnum's, who expects to make a fortun' by exhibitin' the valooable wardrobe of a gentleman of fashion." Dick did not shed many tears over his loss, as, in his present circumstances, he never expected to have any further use for the well-worn garments. It may be stated that he afterwards saw them adorning the figure of Micky Maguire; but whether that estimable young man stole them himself, he never ascertained. As to the...
Page 11 - While this conversation had been going on, Dick had got up. His bedchamber had been a wooden box half full of straw, on which the young bootblack had reposed his weary limbs, and slept as soundly as if it had been a bed of down. He dumped down into the straw without taking the trouble of undressing. Getting up too was an equally short process. He jumped out of the box, shook himself, picked out one or two straws that had found their way into rents in his clothes, and, drawing a well-worn cap over...
Page 219 - He knew that he had only himself to depend upon, and he determined to make the most of himself, a resolution which is the secret of success in nine cases out of ten. "Dick," said Fosdick, one evening, after they had completed their studies, "I think you'll have to get another teacher soon.
Page 105 - No, I aint always. Sometimes I have the blues." "When?" "Wnll, once last winter it was awful cold, and there was big holes in my shoes, and my gloves and all my warm clothes was at the tailor's. I felt as if life was sort of tough, and I'd like it if some rich man would adopt me, and give me plenty to eat and drink and wear, without my havin
Page 7 - ... serial story to the pages of the SCHOOLMATE, a well-known juvenile magazine, during the year 1867. While in course of publication, it was received with so many evidences of favor that it has been rewritten and considerably enlarged, and is now presented to the public as the first volume of a series intended to illustrate the life and experiences of the friendless and vagrant children who are now numbered by thousands in New York and other cities.
Page 14 - em and sent 'em to me, he's bigger than me, and that's why they don't fit." "It seems you have distinguished friends. Now, my lad, I suppose you would like your money." "I shouldn't have any objection," said Dick. "I believe," said the gentleman, examining his pocketbook, "I haven't got anything short of twenty-five cents. Have you got any change?" "Not a cent," said Dick. "All my money's invested in the Erie Railroad.
Page 127 - Good-by, my lad," said Mr. Whitney. "I hope to hear good accounts of you sometime. Don't forget what I have told you. Remember that your future position depends mainly upon yourself, and that it will be high or low as you choose to make it." He held out his hand, in which was a five-dollar bill. Dick shrunk back. "I don't like to take it,

Bibliographic information