Two Thousand Years of Solitude: Exile After Ovid

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Oxford University Press, Oct 20, 2011 - History - 353 pages
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Banished by the emperor Augustus in AD 8 from Rome to the far-off shores of Romania, the poet Ovid stands at the head of the Western tradition of exiled authors. In his Tristia (Sad Things) and Epistulae ex Ponto (Letters from the Black Sea), Ovid records his unhappy experience of political, cultural, and linguistic displacement from his homeland. Two Thousand Years of Solitude: Exile After Ovid is an interdisciplinary study of the impact of Ovid's banishment upon later Western literature, exploring responses to Ovid's portrait of his life in exile. For a huge variety of writers throughout the world in the two millennia after his exile, Ovid has performed the rôle of archetypal exile, allowing them to articulate a range of experiences of disgrace, dislocation, and alienation; and to explore exile from a number of perspectives, including both the personal and the fictional.
  

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Contents

Two Thousand Years of Responses to Ovids Exile
1
I OVIDIAN EXILE AND THE POETS
21
II OVIDIAN EXILE IN MODERN PROSE
239

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About the author (2011)


Jennifer Ingleheart was educated at Wadham College, Oxford, where she gained her BA, MSt., and DPhil. in Classics. After temporary teaching positions at Marlboro College, Vermont, The University of Wales, Swansea, and Keble and Wadham Colleges in Oxford, she took up a lectureship in Durham in 2004. She is the author of numerous articles on Latin poetry and its reception, and A Commentary on Ovid, Tristia, Book 2 (OUP, 2010).

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