Mao's Last Dancer (Movie Tie-In) (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Jul 27, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 528 pages
881 Reviews
From a desperately poor village in northeast China, at age eleven, Li Cunxin was chosen by Madame Mao's cultural delegates to be taken from his rural home and brought to Beijing, where he would study ballet. In 1979, the young dancer arrived in Texas as part of a cultural exchange, only to fall in love with America-and with an American woman. Two years later, through a series of events worthy of the most exciting cloak-and-dagger fiction, he defected to the United States, where he quickly became known as one of the greatest ballet dancers in the world. This is his story, told in his own inimitable voice.

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5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
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Easy to read in english. - Goodreads
a good read, ending a little rushed - Goodreads
Good read and very well done with the movie portrayal. - Goodreads
What an interesting (and educational) read! - Goodreads
very simple writing yet wonderful - Goodreads
The writing was really flat and unexciting. - Goodreads

Review: Mao's Last Dancer

User Review  - Erin Hwang - Goodreads

Erin Hwang English 9B March 10, 2013 Mao's Last Dancer Book Review After reading Mao's Last Dancer, I've reconsidered how I'm going to live the rest of my life. As said by Michael Jordan, “Some ... Read full review

Review: Mao's Last Dancer

User Review  - Fransa0 - Goodreads

wow how could you still be so positive, great so far Read full review

Contents

PART ONE MY CHILDHOOD
HOME
MY NIANG AND
A COMMUNE CHILDHOOD
THE SEVEN OF
NANA
CHAIRMAN MAOS CLASSROOM
LEAVING HOME
THE
MY OWN VOICE
TEACHER XIAOS WORDS
TURNING POINTS
THE MANGO
CHANGE
ON THE WAY TO THE WEST
THE FILTHY CAPITALIST AMERICA

PART TWO BEIJING
FEATHER IN A WHIRLWIND
THE CAGED BIRD
THAT FIRST LONELY YEAR
GOODBYE CHINA
PART THREE THE WEST
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Li Cunxin was born in a small village near the city of Qingdao, in northern China. At eighteen, he was selected to perform at the Houston Ballet, which led to a dramatic defection to the United States. He has performed as a soloist with the Houston Ballet and as a principal artist with the Australian Ballet.

Bibliographic information