How Long Is a Piece of String?: More Hidden Mathematics of Everyday Life

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Robson, Jun 1, 2005 - Mathematics - 228 pages
4 Reviews

In this sequel to Why Do Buses Come in Threes?, you will find that many intriguing everyday questions have mathematical answers. Discover the astonishing 37% rule for blind dates, the avoidance tactics of the gentleman's urinal, and some extraordinary scams that have been devised to get rich quick. Also included are the origins of the seven-day week and the seven-note scale, an explanation of why underdogs win, clever techniques for detecting fraud, and the reason why epidemics sweep across a nation and disappear just as quickly. Whatever your mathematical ability, this fun, thought-provoking book will illuminate the ways in which math underlies so much in our everyday lives.

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Review: How Long Is a Piece of String?: More Hidden Mathematics of Everyday Life

User Review  - Carol Ferro - Goodreads

Great straightforward explanation of everyday maths. This will prove invaluable in proving I'm right about counterintuitive statistics! Read full review

Review: How Long Is a Piece of String?: More Hidden Mathematics of Everyday Life

User Review  - Martin - Goodreads

I've been reading a lot of books lately on the horrors of innumeracy. It was a pleasure to turn the reading experience on its head and instead read about the joy of numeracy! I knew the prequel left much more to said on the table, and the sequel delivered on that notion. Much fun. Read full review

Contents

What Makes a Hit Single?
23
Should I Phone a Friend?
43
Is it Quicker to Take the Stairs?
57
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Rob Eastaway is a writer, lecturer and cricket-lover. He is a life-long follower of Lancashire CC and spends his summer weekends playing cricket - he is one of those cricketers who rub the ball on their trousers. He is co-author of two bestselling books about the hidden mathematics of everyday life. Why Do Buses Come in Threes? and How Long is a Piece of String?

Wyndham, a former junior international bridge player, runs a market research company.

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