Envisioning real utopias

Front Cover
Verso, Jun 14, 2010 - Law - 394 pages
4 Reviews
Rising inequality of income and power, along with the recent convulsions in the finance sector, have made the search for alternatives to unbridled capitalism more urgent than ever. Yet there has been a global retreat by the Left: on the assumption that liberal capitalism is the only game in town, political theorists tend to dismiss as utopian any attempt to rethink our social and economic relations. As Fredric Jameson first argued, it is now easier for us to imagine the end of the world than an alternative to capitalism.

Erik Olin Wright's Envisioning Real Utopias is a comprehensive assault on the quietism of contemporary social theory. Building on a lifetime's work analyzing the class system in the developed world, as well as exploring the problem of the transition to a socialist alternative, Wright has now completed a systematic reconstruction of the core values and feasible goals for Left theorists and political actors. Envisioning Real Utopias aims to put the social back into socialism, laying the foundations for a set of concrete, emancipatory alternatives to the capitalist system. Characteristically rigorous and engaging, this will become a landmark of social thought for the twenty-first century.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Envisioning Real Utopias

User Review  - Duncan Mclaren - Goodreads

Not a light read, but an illuminating exploration of the prospects for social empowerment in the modern world. Read full review

Review: Envisioning Real Utopias

User Review  - Ray - Goodreads

A hopeful and encouraging look at ways to work within the capitalistic framework with the aim to improve economic, social, and political equality. Well-researched, with a look at efforts like the ... Read full review

Contents

E
53
10
79
Alternatives
89
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Erik Olin Wright is Vilas Distinguished Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin. His recent books include Deepening Democracy: institutional innovations in empowered participatory governance (2003), Class Counts: student edition (Cambridge, 2000) and Class Counts: Comparative Studies in Class Analysis (Cambridge, 1997).