Mont Pelée and the Tragedy of Martinique: A Study of the Great Catastrophes of 1902, with Observations and Experiences in the Field (Google eBook)

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J. B. Lippincott Company, 1903 - Pelée, Mount (Martinique) - 335 pages
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Page 16 - Pierre, the quaintest, queerest, and the prettiest withal, among West Indian cities : all stone-built and stone-flagged, with very narrow streets, wooden or zinc awnings, and peaked roofs of red tile, pierced by gabled dormers. Most of the buildings are painted in a clear yellow tone, which contrasts delightfully with the burning blue ribbon of tropical sky above ; and no street is absolutely level ; nearly all of them climb hills, descend into hollows, curve, twist, describe sudden angles. There...
Page 249 - PM on Wednesday, I left in company with several gentlemen in a small row-boat to go to Chateaubelair, where we hoped to get a better view of the eruption. As we passed Layou, the first town on the leeward coast, the smell of sulphuretted hydrogen was very perceptible. Before we got half way on our journey, a vast column of steam, smoke and ashes ascended to a prodigious elevation.
Page 250 - ... and scoriae. The electric flashes were marvellously rapid in their motions and numerous beyond all computation. These with the thundering noise of the mountain mingled with the dismal roar of the lava, the shocks of earthquake, the falling of stones, the enormous quantity of material ejected from the belching craters, producing a darkness as dense as a starless midnight, the plutonic energy of the mountain growing greater every moment combined to make up a scene of horrors.
Page 250 - ... flower-shapes, some dark, some effulgent, others pearly white, and all brilliantly illuminated by electric flashes. Darkness, however, soon fell upon us. The sulphurous air was laden with fine dust that fell thickly upon and around us, discolouring the sea ; a black rain began to fall, followed by another rain of favilla, lapilli, and scoriae.
Page 250 - The electric flashes were marvellously rapid in their motions and numerous beyond all computation. These, with the thundering noise of the mountain, mingled with the dismal roar of the lava, the shocks of earthquake, the falling of stones, the enormous quantity of material ejected from the belching craters, producing a darkness as dense as a starless midnight, the plutonic energy of the mountain growing greater and greater every moment, combined to make up a scene of horrors.
Page 62 - The smell of sulphur is so strong that horses on the streets stop and snort, and some of them are obliged to give up, drop in their harness and die from suffocation. Many of the people are obliged to wear wet handkerchiefs over their faces to protect them from the fumes of sulphur. " My husband assures me that there is no immediate danger, and when there is the least particle of danger we will leave the place.
Page 134 - ... even by supporting them with large stones. The sea seemed to roll back upon itself, and to be driven from its banks by the convulsive motion of the earth ; it is certain, at least, the shore was considerably enlarged, and several sea-animals were left upon it.
Page 250 - I judged that the awful pillar was fully eight miles in height. We were rapidly proceeding to our point of observation, when an immense cloud, dark, dense, and apparently thick with volcanic material, descended over our pathway, impeding our progress and warning us to proceed no farther. This...
Page 119 - ... found the father Delavaud, still clothed and lying on the bed, dead. He was purple and inflated, but the clothing was intact. I went out and found in the court two corpses interlocked; they were the bodies of the two young men who had been with me in the room. Reentering the house, I came upon the bodies of two men who had been in the garden when I returned to my house at the beginning of the catastrophe. Crazed and almost overcome, I threw myself upon a bed, inert and awaiting death. My senses...
Page 119 - ... that separated me from my room, and felt my arms and legs burning, also my body. I dropped upon a table. At this moment four others sought refuge in my room, crying and writhing with pain, although their garments showed no sign of having been touched by flame. At the end of ten minutes, one of these, the young Delavaud girl, aged about ten years, fell dead ; the others left. I then got up and went into another room, where I found the father Delavaud, still clothed and lying on the bed, dead....

References from web pages

JSTOR: The Martinique Eruptions
The Martinique Eruptions. jsf. The Geographical Journal, Vol. 21, No. 5, 542. May, 1903. THE MARTINIQUE ERUPTIONS. 'Mont Pelee and the Tragedy of Martinique ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0016-7398(190305)21%3A5%3C542%3ATME%3E2.0.CO%3B2-A

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