The hidden pope: the untold story of a lifelong friendship that is changing the relationship between Catholics and Jews : the personal journey of John Paul II and Jerzy Kluger

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G.K. Hall, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 575 pages
4 Reviews
In 1978, shortly after his election as Pope, Karol Wajtyla made history by granting his first audience of his papacy with his childhood friend, Jerzy Kluger, opening a new era in relations between Catholics and Jews. Here, Darcy O'Brien offers a moving account of the extraordinary relationship of the two from their boyhood in a small Polish town to their experiences under Nazi and Soviet tyranny, and finally, their reunion almost thirty years later. As much dramatic coming-of-age story as historical document. The Hidden Pope is a portrait of one of the greatest spiritual leaders of the century.

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Review: The Hidden Pope: The Untold Story of a Lifelong Friendship That Is Changing the Relationship Between Catholics and Jews - The Personal Journey of John Paul II and Jerzy Kluger

User Review  - Thegavinclan - Goodreads

This book was an incredible life story of Pope John Paul. It was enlightening to read about the story of one of the most powerful people on our planet at a point in history and how his upbringing shaped him to become Pope. Read full review

Review: The Hidden Pope: The Untold Story of a Lifelong Friendship That Is Changing the Relationship Between Catholics and Jews - The Personal Journey of John Paul II and Jerzy Kluger

User Review  - Peter - Goodreads

There is no more controversial aspect to the history of the Roman Catholic Church than the relationship between Jews and Catholics. This book provides one angle on the controversy which is worth exploring. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
7
Section 3
11
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

An essayist for The New Yorker and recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Ernest Hemingway Award.

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