The History of Ancient Greece: Its Colonies and Conquests from the Earliest Accounts Till the Division of the Macedonian Empire in the East, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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A. Strahan, 1801 - Greece
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Page 38 - Know that a son is born to us. We thank the gods, not so much for their gift, as for bestowing it at a time when Aristotle lives. We assure ourselves that you will form him a prince, worthy of his father, and worthy of Macedon.
Page 67 - Heaven so pleases,) shall regain your dominions, recall those opportunities your supineness hath neglected, and chastise the insolence of this man. For you are not to imagine, that like a god, he is to enjoy his present greatness for ever fixed and unchangeable.
Page 183 - Selymbrians, now besieged by me, and who are by no means included in the treaty of pacification, by which we stand mutually engaged. Such were the orders your officer received, not from the people of Athens, but from certain magistrates, and others in no private station, who are by all means solicitous to prevail on the people to violate their engagements, and to commence hostilities against me.
Page 361 - Anabasis," in which he describes the expedition of the younger Cyrus and the retreat of the ten thousand Greeks, is his most famous book. But his "Cyropaedia...
Page 385 - His chawas of a low stature, and somewhat deformed ; but the activity and elevation of his mind animated and ennobled his frame. By a life of continual labour, and by an early and habitual practice of the gymnastic exercises, he had hardened his body against the impressions of cold and heat, hunger and thirst...
Page 384 - The laft remains of ftrength , he fpent in affifting at daily facrifices to the Gods. During his illnefs he fpoke but little, and that only concerning his intended expeditions. The temples were crowded by his friends ; the generals waited in the hall ; the fol.diers furrounded the gates.
Page 259 - Persians from attacking them in flank, as they successively reached the shore. The Persian cavalry behaved with courage; the first squadrons of the Macedonians were driven back into the stream. But Alexander, who animated the companions...
Page 184 - Athens, but from certain magistrates, and others in no private station, who are by all means solicitous to prevail on the people to violate their engagements, and to commence hostilities against me. This they have much more at heart than the relief of Selymbria, fondly imagining that they may derive advantages from such a rupture. Persuaded as I am, that our mutual interest requires us to frustrate their wicked schemes, I have given orders that the vessels brought In to us be immediately released....
Page 386 - ... the ftubbornnefs of ignorance and the force of habit, when he attempted to enlighten barbarifm, to foften fervitude, and to tranfplant the improvements of Greece into an African and Afiatic foil, where they have never been known to flouriih.
Page 384 - ... to his life in the thirty-third year of his age, and in the thirteenth of his reign. After the first days of the disorder he had been conveyed to the cool verdure of a beautiful garden, but the malady increasing, he was soon brought back to the palace.

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