The American Arithmetic: Adapted to the Currency of the United States. Compiled for the Use of Schools (Google eBook)

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C. Norris & Company and sold at their bookstore; sold also by E. Little & Company, Newburyport, and by the principal booksellers in New England, 1812 - Arithmetic - 231 pages
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Page 125 - Separate the given number into periods of two figures each, beginning at the right hand: the period on the left will often contain but one figure.
Page 96 - Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 193 - RULE. — To the square of the bung diameter add the square of the head diameter ; multiply the sum by the length, and the product by .0014 for ale gallons, or by .0017 for wine gallons.
Page 84 - Place the numbers on the same line, and divide by the least number that will divide two or more of them without a remainder, and set down in a line below the quotients and the undivided numbers.
Page 64 - Then multiply the second and third terms together, and divide the product by the first term: the quotient will be the fourth term, or answer.
Page 83 - To reduce a mixed number to an improper fraction, — RULE : Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction, to the product add the numerator, and write the result over the denominator.
Page 7 - Multiplication; and denotes that all the numbers, between which it is placed, are to be multiplied together. Thus 9X9 signifies that 9 is to be multiplied by 9, or 9X9X9 must be multiplied.
Page 169 - A sphere is a solid bounded by a curved surface, every point of which is equally distant from a point within called the center.
Page 98 - RULE. Multiply the principal by the rate per cent, and •that product by the number of years : the last product...
Page 4 - An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.

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