Money Mischief: Episodes in Monetary History

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Harcourt Brace & Company, 1994 - Business & Economics - 286 pages
13 Reviews
Nobel Prize-winner Milton Friedman makes clear once and for all that no one is immune from monetary economics--that is, from the effects of its theory and its practices. He demonstrates through historical events the mischief that can result from misunderstanding the monetary system--how, for example, the work of two obscure Scottish chemists destroyed the presidential prospects of William Jennings Bryan and how Franklin D. Roosevelt's decision to appease a few senators from the American West helped communism triumph in China. In Money Mischief Dr. Friedman discusses the creation of value: from stones to feathers to gold. He outlines the central role of monetary theory and shows how it can act to ignite or deepen inflation, as one instance. He explains, in layman's English, what the present monetary system in the United States--a system without historical precedent--means for your paycheck and savings book as well as for the global economy.

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Review: Money Mischief: Episodes in Monetary History

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

A short introduction to monetary history and the causes of inflation. Read full review

Review: Money Mischief: Episodes in Monetary History

User Review  - Clinton - Goodreads

Money Mischief clarifies the significance of monetary economics, for immunization from the impact is unattainable. The book chronicles historical episodes into the mystical phenomena known as money ... Read full review

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About the author (1994)

An influential leader in the field of economics, Milton Friedman had his humble beginnings in New York City, where he was born in 1912 to poor immigrants. Friedman was educated at Rutgers University. He went on to the University of Chicago to earn his A.M., and to Columbia University, where in 1946 he received his Ph.D. That same year he became professor of economics at the University of Chicago and remained there for 30 years. He was also on the research staff at the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1937-1981. Friedman's greatest work is considered to be A Theory of the Consumption Function, published in 1957. Other books include A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960, and The Optimum Quantity of Money and Other Essays. Friedman was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1976.

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