A History of American Privateers (Google eBook)

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Sampson, Low, Marston & Company, 1900 - Privateering - 519 pages
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Contents

II
3
III
22
IV
28
V
43
VI
69
VII
79
VIII
91
IX
113
XXIV
301
XXV
308
XXVI
320
XXVII
328
XXVIII
336
XXIX
350
XXX
359
XXXI
377

X
120
XI
130
XII
138
XIII
148
XIV
167
XV
177
XVI
192
XVII
205
XVIII
223
XIX
225
XX
242
XXI
251
XXII
265
XXIII
279
XXXII
391
XXXIII
401
XXXIV
408
XXXV
420
XXXVI
427
XXXVII
439
XXXVIII
450
XXXIX
462
XL
473
XLI
484
XLII
491
XLIII
503
Copyright

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Page xxi - The public will learn, with sentiments which we shall not presume to anticipate, that a third British frigate has struck to an American. This is an occurrence that calls for serious reflection, this, and the fact stated in our paper of yesterday, that Lloyd's list contains notices of upwards of five hundred British vessels captured in seven months by the Americans.
Page xxi - Any one who had predicted such a result of an American war this time last year would have been treated as a madman or a traitor. He would have been told, if his opponents had condescended to argue with him, that long ere seven months had elapsed the American...
Page 46 - Mr. Brown immediately resolved on her destruction; and he forthwith directed one of his trusty ship-masters to collect eight of the largest long-boats in the harbor, with five oars to each, to have the oars and rowlocks well muffled, to prevent noise, and to place them at Fenner's Wharf, directly opposite the dwelling of Mr.
Page 46 - Point, and would not float off until three o'clock, the next morning; and inviting those persons who felt a disposition to go and destroy that troublesome vessel, to repair in the evening to Mr. James Sabin's house. About nine o'clock, I took my father's gun, and my powder horn and bullets, and went to Mr.
Page 294 - I do therefore, by virtue of the power and authority in me vested (possessing sufficient force), declare all the ports, harbors, bays, creeks, rivers, inlets, outlets, islands, and seacoast of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in a state of strict and rigorous blockade.
Page 131 - Woodbridge testified at the bar of the House of Lords that " the number of ships lost by capture or destroyed by American privateers since the commencement of the war is seven hundred and thirty-three, of which, after deducting for those retaken and restored, there remained five hundred and fifty-nine, the value of which, including the ships, cargoes, etc., amounted, upon a very moderate calculation, to 1,800,633 18*.
Page 165 - Beverly, where we found eleven other ships, all larger and finer vessels than the Cicero all belonging to the same owners, the brothers Cabot laid up for the winter. Yet such are the vicissitudes of war and the elements, that before the close of the year they were all lost by capture or wreck, and the house of Cabot had not a single ship afloat upon the ocean.
Page 299 - ... Captain Boyle's handsome conduct merits the mention that the day after the action, when the captured schooner was released as a cartel to Havana, in compassion to her wounded, the commander of the " St. Lawrence " gave him a letter, in the event of his being taken by a British cruiser, testifying to his "obliging attention and watchful solicitude to preserve our effects, and render us comfortable during the short time we were in his possession ; " in which, he added, the captain " was carefully...
Page 188 - ... the expense of your voyage. If a frigate is granted by the French admira[l] to convoy you, the captain of her will be instructed by the admiral to receive any moneys which it may be thought proper to put on board of him. I should suppose that by dividing the risk, or shipping a part on board of each, there will be greater safety, than putting all in one bottom.
Page 294 - I consider the force under my command adequate to maintain strictly, rigorously, and effectually, the said blockade. And I do hereby require the respective officers, whether captains, commanders, or commanding officers, under my command, employed or to be employed on the coasts of England, Ireland, and Scotland, to pay strict attention to the execution of this my proclamation. And I do hereby caution and forbid the ships and vessels of all and every nation, in amity and peace with the United States,...

References from web pages

JSTOR: A History of American Privateers
A History of American Privateers. By EDGAR STANTON MACLAY. (New York: D. Appleton and Co. 1899. Pp. xl, 519.) MR. MACLAY is the author of a History of the ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0002-8762(190007)5%3A4%3C769%3AAHOAP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-2& origin=crossref

A history of American privateers | Reference & Research Book News ...
A history of American privateers from Reference & Research Book News in Reference provided free by Find Articles.
findarticles.com/ p/ articles/ mi_m0QLQ/ is_/ ai_n16879571

PRIVATEERS.; Mr. Maclay's History of American Ones -- A Stirring ...
... the standard work upon that subject, now presents in an octavo volume of over 500 pages bearing the title of "A History of American Privateers." ...
query.nytimes.com/ gst/ abstract.html?res=FA0A1EFA3E5B11738DDDAD0A94DA405B808CF1D3

War of 1812:Chasseur: privateer engages HMS St. Lawrence
Reference: A History of American Privateers Edgar S. Maclay New York 1899. The Chasseur, Captain Thomas Boyle, was familiarly known as the Pride of ...
www.war-of-1812.co.uk/ chasseur.html

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