The Living Age, Volume 171 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E. Littell & Company, 1886
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Page 388 - And though a linguist should pride himself to have all the tongues that Babel cleft the world into, yet if he have not studied the solid things in them as well as the words and lexicons, he were nothing so much to be esteemed a learned man, as any yeoman or tradesman competently wise in his mother dialect only.
Page 213 - And immediately the angel of the Lord smote him, because he gave not God the glory ; and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.
Page 306 - O Lord, thou knowest how busy I must be this day. If I forget thee, do not thou forget me.
Page 496 - God ; for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is the rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
Page 277 - I am somewhat too fond of these great mercies, but also because I should have often brought to my mind the many hardships, miseries, and wants that my poor family was like to meet with, should I be taken from them, especially my poor blind child, who lay nearer my heart than all beside. Oh ! the thoughts of the hardship I thought my poor blind one might go under, would break my heart to pieces. Poor child...
Page 391 - And each vacuity of sense by pride : These build as fast as knowledge can destroy ; In folly's cup still laughs the bubble joy ; One prospect lost, another still we gain, And not a vanity is given in vain : Ev'n mean self-love becomes, by force divine, The scale to measure others
Page 171 - NOW the lusty spring is seen ; Golden yellow, gaudy blue, Daintily invite the view. Everywhere on every green, Roses blushing as they blow, And enticing men to pull, Lilies whiter than the snow, Woodbines of sweet honey full : All love's emblems, and all cry, " Ladies, if not plucked, we die.
Page 216 - Ned, my ambition is prevalent, so that I contemn the grovelling condition of a clerk, or the like, to which my fortune condemns me, and would willingly risk my life, though not my character, to exalt my station. I am confident, Ned, that my youth excludes me from any hope of immediate preferment, nor do I desire it ; but I mean to prepare the way for futurity.
Page 183 - ... direction, stumbling along over twisted roots and fallen trees, with their eyes turned up to the sky. In this way they traced the honey-laden bees to their hive, in the hollow trunk of a blasted oak, where, after buzzing about for a moment, they entered a hole about sixty feet from the ground.
Page 78 - God has conceded two sights to a man One, of men's whole work, time's completed plan, The other, of the minute's work, man's first Step to the plan's completeness...

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