Zionism in an Arab Country: Jews in Iraq in the 1940s

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Routledge, Aug 2, 2004 - History - 312 pages
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Zionism in an Arab Country explores the relations between the Zionist establishment in Israel, and the Jewish community in Iraq. This relationship is centred on two organizations: a Zionist movement and a defense organization. By reviewing the activity of these organizations, Esther Meir-Glitzstein examines the decade preceding mass immigration, and reveals the political, societal, economic and cultural developments that shaped the history of Iraqi Jewry in this crucial period.
Beyond the main focus on the sphere of Zionist activity, Meir-Glitzstein also uncovers the basic problems that shaped both the development of Iraqi Jewry in the 1940s and the policy of the Zionist establishment - trapped between Arab nationalism and Jewish nationalism. Finally, she elucidates the reasons and circumstances that led to the mass immigration of Jews from Iraq to the state of Israel.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Relations between the Jews British and Arabs in Iraq in the 1940s
10
2 The Reversal in Zionist Policy visàvis the Jews of Islamic Countries
32
The Emissaries and the Jews of Iraq
49
4 The Hehalutz Movement in Iraq
64
5 Young Women in the Zionist Movement
90
6 The Zionist Struggle for the Jewish Street
104
7 Legal and Illegal Aliyah
131
8 The Haganah
146
Iraqi Jewry during the War of Independence
160
10 The Zionist Movement in Iraq during the Persecutions
179
The Mass Immigration of Iraqi Jewry to Israel
195
Conclusion
213
Bibliography
219
Index
224
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Dr. Esther Meir-Glitzstein is a Lecturer in Jewish History in the Program for Israel Studies in Ben Gurion University of the Negev and Research Fellow, Ben Gurion Research Center. Her fields of research are the history of the Jews in Arab countries in the modern period, their emigration and the integration of Mizrahi immigrants in Israeli society.

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