A Thousand Days in Venice: An Unexpected Romance

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Algonquin Books, Jun 7, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 288 pages
8 Reviews

Fernando first sees Marlena across the Piazza San Marco and falls in love from afar. When he sees her again in a Venice caf a year later, he knows it is fate. He knows little English; she, a divorced American chef traveling through Italy, speaks only food-based Italian. Marlena thought she was done with romantic love, incapable of intimacy. Yet within months of their first meeting, she has quit her job, sold her house in St. Louis, kissed her two grown sons good-bye, and moved to Venice to marry Ňthe stranger,Ó as she calls Fernando.
This deliciously satisfying memoir is filled with the foods and flavors of Italy and peppered with culinary observations and recipes. But the main course here is an enchanting true story about a woman who falls in love with both a man and a city, and finally finds the home she didnŐt even know she was missing.

  

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Contents

PROLOGUE Venice 1989
1
1 Signora the Telephone Is for You
5
2 Theres a Venetian in My Bed
19
3 Why Shouldnt I Go and Live on the Fringes of an Adriatic Lagoon with a BlueberryEyed Stranger?
36
4 Did It Ever Happen to You?
49
5 Savonarola Could Have Lived Here
62
6 If I Could Give Venice to You for a Single Hour It Would Be This Hour
72
7 That Lush Moment Just Before Ripeness
91
10 I Knew a Woman I Knew a Man
136
11 Ah Cara Mia in Six Months Everything Can Change in Italy
147
12 A White Wool Dress Flounced in Twelve Inches of Mongolian Lamb
160
13 Here Comes the Bride
175
14 I Just Wanted to Surprise You
190
15 The Return of Mr Quicksilver
216
16 Ten Red Tickets
236
FOOD FOR A STRANGER Recipes
251

8 Everyone Cares How They Are Judged
101
9 Have You Understood that These Are the Earths Most Beautiful Tomatoes?
117
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
271
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

An American chef and food and wine journalist, Marlena de Blasi has written five memoirs, a novel, and two books about the regional foods of Italy. She lives with her husband in the Umbrian hilltown of Orvieto. Her work has been translated into twenty-six languages.

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