Mental and moral science: a compendium of psychology and ethics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, 1868 - Philosophy - 850 pages
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Contents

S Waxing and waning movements
23
Acute Diseases of the nerves nervous Fatigue Healthy nerves
30
Exemplified in detail in the Muscular Feelings and the Sen
35
Sensations of Tasto
37
Relishes and Disgusts ib 5 Tastes proper Sweet and Bitter
38
SENSB OF SMELL 1 Smell related to the Lungs
39
gaseous or volatile bodies ib 3 Development of odours by heat light and moisture ib 4 Diffusion of odours
40
in sympathy with the lungs are Fresh and Close odours
41
Fragrant odours and the opposite ib 9 Odours involving tactile sensibility Pungency
42
SENSE OF TOUCH 1 Touch an intellectual Sense The Objects solid bodies
43
Emotional Soft Touch Pungent Touch Tempera ture Tickling and acute pains
44
Plurality of PointsWebers experi ments Pressure
45
Resistance Hardness and Softness Roughness and Smoothness Exten sion or the Coexisting in Space
47
FEELINGS OF MOVEMENT Pao
49
SENSE OF HEARING 1 Objects of Hearingmaterial bodies in a state of tremor
51
The Ear 3 The mode of action in hearing
52
Pitch Waxing and Waning Harmony and Discord
54
Clearness Timbre Articulate sounds Distance and Direction
55
SENSE OF SIOHT 1 Objects of Sight
56
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
60
Light Colour Lustre ib 6 Sensations involving the Movements of the Eye Visible Move ment Visible Form Apparent Size Distance Volume Visible Sit...
62
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
guity
85
Spontaneous and Instinctive actions strengthened by exercise
86
Conjoined or Aggregated Movements ib 5 Successions of Movements
87
Intervention of Sensations in trains of Movement ib 7 Conditions governing the rate of Acquisition generally ib t Circumstances favouring the adhesi...
88
All acquirements suppose Physical Vigour
89
Association of Ideas of Movement t 11 The seat of Ideas the same as of Sensations or Actualities ib 12 The tendency of Ideas to become Actualities a ...
90
The principle applied to explain Sympathy
91
Points common to the Idea and to the Actuality
92
SENSATIONS OF THE SAME SENSE 18 In all the senses different sensations are associated together
93
Separate ideas become selfsustaining by repetition ib 20 Association of Sensations of Touch
94
Law of the Rate of Acquirement in Touch ib 22 The acquirements of Touch most numerous in the blind
95
Forms and Coloured surfaces
97
Movements with Sensations Muscular Ideas with Sensations Architecture Sensations with Sensations
99
Law of the Rate of such acquirements
100
Localization of the Bodily Feelings
101
Our body is an object fact with subject associations
102
0 Pleasure and Pain can persist and be reproduced ideally ib 31 Law of the association
103
ASSOCIATIONS OF VOLITION 40 Contiguous association of actions and states of feeling
109
Our ideas of external nature are associations of sensible qualities ib 42 The Naturalist mind represents disinterested association
110
Association of things habitually conjoined in our view ib 45 Maps Diagrams and Pictorial Representations HI SUCCESSIONS
111
MECHANICAL ACQUISITIONS 47 Summary of conditions of Mechanical Acquirement
114
Proper duration of exercises
115
ACQUISITIONS OF LANGUAGE 49 Oral Language involves the Voice and the Ear
117
Operation of Special Interest in lingual acquisitions ib 53 Elocution involves an Ear for Cadence
118
Written language appeals to the sense of Visible Form ib 55 Short methods of acquiring language ib 56 Verbal adhesiveness an aid to the memory of...
119
Knowledge as Science is clothed in artificial symbols ib 68 The Object Sciences are Concrete or Abstract ib 59 The Subject Sciences are grounded on...
120
Circumstances favouring acquirements in mental Science ib 61 Supposed faculty of SelfConsciousness
122
Fine Art constructions give refined pleasure ib 64 Conditions of Acquisition in Fine Art
123
History the succession of events as narrated ib 66 Transactions witnessed impress themselves as Sensations and Actions
124
Impediment of Diversity Special condition for this case
130
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations
136
I Definition
143
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
149
MIXED CONTIGUITY AND SIMILARITY
155
CONSTRUCTIVE ASSOCIATION
161
Constructing new muscular ideas Hitting a mark Archi
165
Construction of Sentences
168
Mechanical Invention Administrative contrivances Judg
171
In one view to abstract is to refer to a class
177
THE ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE
181
the Theory of Vision and the Percep
188
Objection to the theory of Acquired Perception that we are
194
Energies
199
Hume Summary of his philosophical doctrines generally
207
THE EMOTIONS
215
The influence of Belief a test of strength of feeling
223
NOVELTYWONDER
229
Species of Terror 1 The case of the lower animals
235
Simple characters of the emotion
242
J S Mill Advances a Psychological Theory of the Belief
248
LOVE OF APPROBATION
254
Selfcomplacency and the Love of Admiration as motives
256
the pleasure of malevolence
262
Chance or Uncertainty contributes to the engrossment
269
EMOTIONS OP ACTIONPURSUIT
270
Completion of Sympathyvicarious action
279
Sympathy with pleasure and pain
280
Sympathy supports mens feelings and opinions ib 8 Moulding of mens sentiments and views ib 9 Sympathy an indirect source of pleasure to the sym...
281
Sympathy cannot subsist upon extreme selfabnegation
282
IDEAL EMOTION 1 The persistence of Feeling makes the life in the Ideal
283
Ideal Emotion is affected by Organic states
284
Feeling in the Actual often thwarted by the accompaniments
287
Music
296
Beauty and Sublimity of Natural Objects Human Beauty
302
associated emotions or affections
309
The causes of Laughter
315
A link has to be formed between actions and feelings
322
Second stage the uniting of movements with Intermediate Ends
332
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS
338
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
Conflict of concurring pleasures and pains 854
355
The Deliberative process conforms to the theory of the Will 862
363
1 the wants of the system 2
369
Belief attaches to the pursuit of intermediate ends
375
Belief in the order of the World varies with the three elements
382
THE MORAL HABITS
385
Invigoration
391
The perplexity of the question is owing to the inaptness of
398
Meanings of Choice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
405
The NeoPlatonists The Moral End to be attained through
408
Pelaoius and Arminius
411
Locke Liberty opposed not to necessity but to coercion
413
in favour of freedom Reconciled necessity with accounta
421
ETHICS
429
TILThe Bonum Summum Bonum or Happiness
432
The Ethical End is limited according to the view taken of Moral
438
Objections against Utility I Happiness is not the sole
444
Emotions generally
453
PART II
460
The Cynics and the Cyrenaics Cynic succession The proper
467
Book Second Definition and classification of the Moral virtues
481
Book Fourth Liberality Magnificence Magnanimity Mild
490
Book Seventh Gradations of moral strength and moral weakness
500
Grounds of Friendship
506
The Stoics The succession of Stoical philosophers Theological
513
Epicukus Life and writings His successors Virtue and vice
526
Hobbes Abstract of the Ethical part of Leviathan Constitu
543
Cumberland Standard of Moral Good summed up in Benevolence
556
Clarke The eternal Fitness and Unfitness of Things determine
562
Butler Characteristics of our Moral Perceptions Disinterested
573
Mandeville Virtue supported solely by selfinterest Compassion
593
Home Question whether Reason or Sentiment be the foundation
607
Price The distinctions of Bight and Wrong are perceived by
619
Hartley Account of Disinterestedness The Moral Sense a pro
633
Stewaet The Moral Faculty an original power Criticism
639
Beown Moral approbation a simple emotion of the mind Univer
651
estimate of Pleasures and Pains Classification of Pleasures
659
Mackintosh Universality of Moral Distinctions Antithesis
670
James Mill Primary constituents of the Moral Faculty
679
Austin Laws defined and classified The Divine Laws how
686
Whewell Opposing schemes of Morality Proposal to reconcile
697
Kant Distinguishes between the empirical and the rational mode
725
Cousin Analysis of the sentiments aroused in us by human
740
JorFFROY Each creature has a special nature and a special
746
Muscular Feelings compared with Sensations The muscular
1
The primary attributes of IntellectDifference Agreement
2
There may be a Temperament for Emotipn
3
Higher Combinations of language
6
Natural tendency to ascribe separate existence to abstractions
7
Classification of the kinds of Food
8
Hope and Despondency are phases of Belief
10
system 13
13
The Stoics Their alteration of the Categories 21
21
Locke General terms the signs of general ideas 27
27
Brows A general word designates certain particulars together
30
Ritual
32
Money Formali
34
The Schoolmen Opposing views were held The question
49
Leibnitz Charges Locke with overlooking the distinction between
56
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal Memory
67
Kant His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
68
Applications of a Knowledge of the Intellectual Powers 84
84
ties Truth 105
105
Influence of association in Fine Art Alisons Theory 106
106

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 207 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Page 96 - I think, is a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places...
Page 549 - The RIGHT OF NATURE, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which in his own judgment and reason he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
Page 702 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
Page 659 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
Page 550 - From this fundamental law of nature, by which men are commanded to endeavour peace, is derived this second law; that a man be willing, when others are so too, as far forth, as for peace, and defence of himself he shall think it necessary, to lay down this right to all things; and be contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow other men against himself.
Page 707 - In an improving state of the human mind, the influences are constantly on the increase, which tend to generate in each individual a feeling of unity with all the rest ; which, if perfect, would make him never think of, or desire, any beneficial condition for himself, in the benefits of which they are not included.
Page 28 - ... consider some particular parts or qualities separated from others, with which, though they are united in some object, yet it is possible they may really exist without them. But I deny that I can abstract...
Page 203 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Page 705 - Being rational creatures, they go to sea with it ready calculated ; and all rational creatures go out upon the sea of life with their minds made up on the common questions of right and wrong, as well as on many of the far more difficult questions of wise and foolish.

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