Association papers. Part I. Publications printed by special order of the Society for preserving Liberty and Property against Republicans and Levellers, ... Part II. A collection of tracts, ... To which are prefixed, a preface, and the proceedings of the Society. Addressed to all the loyal associations (Google eBook)

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printed for J. Sewell; J. Debrett; J. Downes; Hookham and Carpenter; T. N. Longman; and W. Lane, 1793
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Page 5 - And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as Want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece ; but Poor Dick says, It is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 122 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee : nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.
Page 58 - If the foot shall say, Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body?
Page 3 - The cat in gloves catches no mice, as Poor Richard says. It is true there is much to be done, and perhaps you are weak-handed; but stick to it steadily, and you will see great effects; for, Constant dropping wears away stones; and, By diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable; and Little strokes fell great oaks...
Page 58 - You are no longer a parliament. I tell you, you are no longer a parliament. The Lord has done with you: he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work." Sir Harry Vane exclaiming against this proceeding, he cried with a loud voice, "O! Sir Harry Vane, Sir Harry Vane! The Lord deliver me from Sir Harry Vane!
Page 5 - A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as Poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of: they think, It is day, and will never be night; that a little to be spent out of so much is not worth minding ; but Always taking out of the mealtub, and never putting in, soon comes to the bottom, as Poor Richard says ; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water.
Page 40 - My son, fear thou the LORD and the king : and meddle not with them that are given to change...
Page 2 - One today is worth two tomorrows, as Poor Richard says; and further, Never leave that till tomorrow, which you can do today. If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Are you then your own master? Be ashamed to catch yourself...
Page 58 - For shame," said he to the parliament, "get you gone: give place to honester men; to those who will more faithfully discharge their trust. You are no longer a parliament. I tell you, you are no longer a parliament. The Lord has done with you: he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work.
Page 210 - To fill the ambition of a private man, That Chatham's language was his mother tongue, And Wolfe's great name compatriot with his own.

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