Venice: A Documentary History, 1450-1630

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David Sanderson Chambers, Jennifer Fletcher, Brian Pullan
University of Toronto Press, 2001 - History - 484 pages
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During the Renaissance, there were two centres of art, culture and mercantile power in Italy: Florence, and Venice. This is a sourcebook of promary materials, almost none previously available in English, for the history of the city-state of Venice. The time period covers the apogee of Venetian power and reputation to the beginnings of its decline in the 1630s. Sources used include diaries, chronicles, Inquisitorial records, literature, legislation, and contemporary descriptions, and are organized in sections by theme and accompanied by brief introductions.

Originally published by Basil Blackwell, 1992.

  

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Contents

Praise of the city of Venice 1493
4
A pilgrims impressions 1480
21
a report by the Spanish
31
Theory Description and Panegyric
39
The Doge
45
the Procurators of St Marks
51
Florentine admiration for Venices system of government
61
Benedetto Deis invective against Venice c 1472
68
Magic and superstition c 1580
236
The Nobility
242
Service to the state
254
The Citizenry
261
Craftsmen Boatmen and Porters
280
The boatmen of San Toma
286
manning the reserve fleet 1595
293
The General Situation
299

Corrupt practices
77
Crime and Punishment
87
Opinions about judicial and penal administration
97
The Regulation of Society
105
The struggle against plague
113
The defence of morality
120
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE WEALTH
131
Public Revenue and Expenditure
134
The valuation of houses and land 1459
136
Levying the tenth 1463
137
Revenues of the Venetian government in 1469
139
The sale of minor offices 1510
143
The hazards of speculating on customs duties 15289
144
the grant by Pope Paul III 1544
146
Two mercers make a tax return 1554
147
Revenue of the Venetian Republic in 1587 1594 and 1602
148
Expenditure of the Venetian Republic in 1587 1594 and 1602
153
the Monti 15 7
157
The establishment of a state loan fund 1482
158
Investment in public loan funds and in land 1509
160
The repayment of public debt 157784
162
Fortunes Made and Lost
166
The abundance of good things in Venice
167
The establishment of a board of trade 1507
168
Indebtedness and business failure f 1500
169
The activities and misfortunes of a merchant family the Zane 152450
171
Letter ofa merchant in Aleppo 1551
174
An agreement to establish a merchant partnership 1596
175
Conspicuous Consumption and Styles of Living
177
A magistracy to administer sumptuary laws 1515
178
The Clergy and the People
186
The churches of Venice and the education of the clergy 1604
193
the reform of nunneries
199
Monks friars and nuns c 1580
206
Criticism of the Scuole Grandi 1541
213
The Interdict of Pope Sixtus IV 1482
219
The Apostolic Visitation 15801
223
The appointment of three noblemen to attend the Inquisition
229
The Poor in Hospital
307
The House Poor and the Shamefaced Poor
316
The Germans
328
The church of San Giorgio dei Greci 1511
334
Licence for a Jewish physician 1589
340
LEARNING AND LITERATURE
353
a justification 1487
359
Sarpis presence in intellectual circles c 1600
367
petition
373
Comedies sponsored by a Company of the Hose during Carnival
380
Art for the State Confraternities and Churches
387
Secular commissions and political imagery
393
Art in the service of diplomacy
405
Private Commissions
417
An overseas order for a devotional picture 1473
418
Lotto alters a portrait to please a friend 1542
419
Lotto paints his landlords family 1547
420
Sacred and profane pictures for the King of Spain 1554
421
Doge Marino Grimani orders marble sculpture for his tomb 1601
422
Collections Connoisseurs and Critical Values
423
Andrea Odonis collection 1532
424
A problem of attribution 1529
427
Gabriel Vendramin describes and justifies his collection 1548
428
Architectural style for the Duke of Milans house in Venice 1461
429
A comparison of Giovanni Bellini with later painters
431
Palladio criticized in a dispute with the Scuola dei Mercanti 1572
432
WorkingPractice Technique and Style of Life
434
The property of a prosperous and literate painter 1461
435
Diirers comments on Venetian artists 1506
437
A painters daytoday expenses 1541
438
Lotto takes an apprentice 1548
439
The elderly Titian at work
440
A sculptor orders his own tomb 1576
441
References
443
Glossary
460
Index
465
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

David Chambers is a Reader in Renaissance Studies, Warburg Institute. Brian Pullan is with the Department of Modern History, University of Manchester.

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