The Swing Era: The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945

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Oxford University Press, 1991 - History - 919 pages
2 Reviews
Here is the book jazz lovers have eagerly awaited, the second volume of Gunther Schuller's monumental The History of Jazz. When the first volume, Early Jazz, appeared two decades ago, it immediately established itself as one of the seminal works on American music. Nat Hentoff called it "a remarkable breakthrough in musical analysis of jazz," and Frank Conroy, in The New York Times Book Review, praised it as "definitive.... A remarkable book by any standard...unparalleled in the literature of jazz." It has been universally recognized as the basic musical analysis of jazz from its beginnings until 1933.
The Swing Era focuses on that extraordinary period in American musical history--1933 to 1945--when jazz was synonymous with America's popular music, its social dances and musical entertainment. The book's thorough scholarship, critical perceptions, and great love and respect for jazz puts this well-remembered era of American music into new and revealing perspective. It examines how the arrangements of Fletcher Henderson and Eddie Sauter--whom Schuller equates with Richard Strauss as "a master of harmonic modulation"--contributed to Benny Goodman's finest work...how Duke Ellington used the highly individualistic trombone trio of Joe "Tricky Sam" Nanton, Juan Tizol, and Lawrence Brown to enrich his elegant compositions...how Billie Holiday developed her horn-like instrumental approach to singing...and how the seminal compositions and arrangements of the long-forgotten John Nesbitt helped shape Swing Era styles through their influence on Gene Gifford and the famous Casa Loma Orchestra. Schuller also provides serious reappraisals of such often neglected jazz figures as Cab Calloway, Henry "Red" Allen, Horace Henderson, Pee Wee Russell, and Joe Mooney.
Much of the book's focus is on the famous swing bands of the time, which were the essence of the Swing Era. There are the great black bands--Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Jimmie Lunceford, Earl Hines, Andy Kirk, and the often superb but little known "territory bands"--and popular white bands like Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsie, Artie Shaw, and Woody Herman, plus the first serious critical assessment of that most famous of Swing Era bandleaders, Glenn Miller. There are incisive portraits of the great musical soloists--such as Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Bunny Berigan, and Jack Teagarden--and such singers as Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee, and Helen Forest.
  

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Review: The Swing Era: The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945: The Development of Jazz, 1930-45 (History of Jazz)

User Review  - Eric Hines - Goodreads

This is by far the best music book I've ever read. It is scholarly, no doubt, but Schuller's joy in this music comes through on every page. A rudiemntary ability to read music is a plus with this book ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
46
III
158
IV
198
V
201
VI
222
VII
263
VIII
292
XXXV
617
XXXVI
632
XXXVII
645
XXXVIII
650
XXXIX
652
XL
660
XLI
661
XLII
677

IX
301
X
317
XI
323
XII
326
XIII
350
XIV
367
XV
373
XVI
385
XVII
392
XVIII
403
XIX
412
XX
420
XXI
422
XXII
423
XXIII
426
XXIV
450
XXV
463
XXVI
476
XXVII
502
XXVIII
513
XXIX
527
XXX
547
XXXI
562
XXXII
578
XXXIII
590
XXXIV
609
XLIII
692
XLIV
715
XLV
724
XLVI
728
XLVII
744
XLVIII
752
XLIX
753
L
755
LI
758
LII
760
LIII
763
LIV
770
LV
806
LVI
808
LVII
812
LVIII
816
LIX
825
LX
834
LXI
840
LXII
844
LXIII
851
LXIV
855
LXV
861
LXVI
869
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About the author (1991)


Gunther Schuller began his professional career in 1943, at age seventeen, when he played French horn with the Cincinnati Symphony and later served as first horn in the Metropolitan Opera. A prominent American composer, he has written a wide range of orchestral and chamber music, as well as jazz compositions.

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