The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido for the Suppression of Piracy: With Extracts from the Journal of James Brooke, Esq. of Sarāwak, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, 1846 - Borneo - 575 pages
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Page xx - Sarebus, Balow, Undop, Lamanak, and the numerous tribes of the Batang Lupar — all those which I denominate Sea Dyaks or Dyak Laut. c Meri is a river near Tanjong Barram. d The Millanow are an inoffensive and agricultural people, located chiefly on the rivers of Muka, Oyer, Igan, &c., near Tanjong Sirik. e Malo is a large Dyak tribe located on a small river of the same name, which discharges itself into the Pontiana river. It takes a small fast-pulling boat six days to arrive at Santang from Pontiana,...
Page 252 - After this demonstration affairs proceeded cheerily to a conclusion. The rajah was active in settling ; the agreement was drawn out, sealed, and signed ; guns fired, flags waved ; and on the 24th of September, 1841, I became the Governor of Sarawak, with the fullest powers.
Page 53 - Along the large room are hung many cots, four feet long, formed of the hollow trunk» of trees cut in half, which answer the purpose of seats by day, and beds by night. The Sibnowan Dyaks are a wild-looking, but apparently quiet and inoffensive race. The apartment of their chief — by name, Sejugah — is situated nearly in the centre of the building, and is larger than any other. In front of it nice mats were spread on the occasion of our visit, whilst over our heads dangled about thirty ghastly...
Page 4 - Raffles' views in Java over the whole Archipelago. Fortune and life I give freely ; and if I fail in the attempt, I shall not have lived wholly in vain.
Page 142 - Pangerans, who aimed at alienating his country ; and that if I left him, he should probably have to remain here for the rest of his life, being resolved to die rather than yield to the unjust influence which others were seeking to acquire over him ; and he appealed to me that after our friendly communication I could not, as an English gentleman, desert him under such circumstances. I felt that honourably I could not do so ; and though reluctantly enough, I resolved to give him the aid he asked ;...
Page vi - On the habits of the orangs, as far as I have been able to observe them, I may remark, that they are as dull and as slothful as can well be conceived, and on no occasion when pursuing them did they move so fast as to preclude my keeping pace with them easily through a moderately clear forest; and even when obstructions below (such as wading up to the neck...
Page 65 - The forge here is of the simplest construction, and formed by two hollow trees, each about seven feet high, placed upright, side by side, in the ground ; from the lower extremity of these, two pipes of bamboo are led...
Page viii - which they are stated to build in the trees, would be more properly called a seat or nest, for it has no roof or cover of any sort. The facility with which they form this nest is curious, and I had an opportunity of seeing a wounded female weave the branches together and seat herself, within a minute.
Page 3 - Often foiled, often disappointed, but animated with a perseverance and enthusiasm which defied all obstacle, he waa not until 1838 enabled to set sail from England on his darling project. The intervening years had been devoted to preparation and inquiry ; a year spent in the Mediterranean had tested his vessel, the Royalist...
Page 33 - ... with tea, biscuits, sweetmeats, China play-things, &c. &c. A person coming here should be provided with a few articles of small importance to satisfy the crowd of inferior chiefs. Soap, small parcels of tea, lucifers, writing-paper, a large stock of cigars, biscuits, and knives, are the best; for, without being great beggars, they seem greatly to value these trifles, even in the smallest quantity. The higher class inquired frequently for scents ; and for the great men I know no present which...

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