How to Unspoil Your Child Fast

Front Cover
Basil Books, Oct 1, 2007 - Family & Relationships - 161 pages
27 Reviews
A spoiled child can turn her parents and a home inside out. But loving parents' concerns go beyond their own frustration and fatigue. They fear for their child's future. Spoiled children are prone to depression and anxiety, and can grow into spoiled teens and adults unable to handle life. In plain English, being spoiled can make for a lot of unhappiness, now and later. Fortunately, unlike a spoiled pear, a spoiled child can be unspoiled. By revealing the strategies that have worked for other parents, Richard Bromfield has fashioned a method that's simple, straightforward, and doable. As a bonus, this approach can also benefit many children who have greater troubles, who now go by assorted names such as distractible, impulsive, bipolar, difficult, and oppositional. How to Unspoil Your Child Fast is an easy and enjoyable read that can wield great power to unspoil your child and restore balance to your parenting and home.

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Quick, easy to read, and funny. - Goodreads
Quick read, good advice - Goodreads
Easily applied, down-to-earth, and common-sense advice. - Goodreads
Quick read with great advice. - Goodreads
It had a lot of good tips and examples. - Goodreads

Review: How to Unspoil Your Child Fast: A Speedy, Complete Guide to Contented Children and Happy Parents

User Review  - Leonard - Goodreads

Very compact, common sense advice and easy and fast to read, if it's an emergency! Hope it works! Read full review

Review: How to Unspoil Your Child Fast: A Speedy, Complete Guide to Contented Children and Happy Parents

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

I found this online as a free Kindle book. I was a fast and easy read. It had a lot of good tips and examples. Well worth the time to read. It gave me some good ideas. Read full review

About the author (2007)

Richard Bromfield, PhD, is a graduate of Bowdoin College and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A faculty member of Harvard Medical School, he writes about children, psychotherapy, and family life in both professional and popular periodicals. He is in private practice in Boston, Massachusetts.

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