Trouble the Water: 250 Years of African-American Poetry

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Jerry Washington Ward
Mentor, 1997 - Poetry - 566 pages
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The haunting refrain of the anonymous spiritual "Were You Dere?," the classic rhymes of Frances Ellen Watkins Harper's "Bury Me in a Free Land," the jazz beat of Maya Angelou's "Times-Square-Shoeshine-Composition," and the exquisite balance of Etheridge Knight's haikus-the entire rich and varied tradition of African-American poetry appears in this superb anthology, unified throughout by the authenticity of experiences wrung straight from the soul.Trouble the Water, the first collection to cover close to 300 years of poetic achievement in 400 important works by African-American writers, features women as half the contributors and includes nearly 50 poems from the 1980s and 1990s.

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Contents

Soon One Mawnin
6
Bars Fight August 28 An Address to Miss Phillis
17
On Being Brought from Myself
23
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

JERRY W. WARD, JR. is Professor of English and African American Studies at Dillard University and was previously the Lawrence Durgin Professor of Literature at Tougaloo College. His previous books include Redefining American Literary History (1990), Black Southern Voices (1992), and Trouble the Water: 250 Years of African-American Poetry (1997). His work has also appeared in such journals as Southern Quarterly, Obsidian, and Callaloo.

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