Poor Richard's Almanack: Being the Choicest Morsels of Wisdom, Written During the Years of the Almanack's Publication (Google eBook)

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Peter Pauper Press, Inc., 1987 - Literary Criticism - 77 pages
27 Reviews
'Poor Richard's Almanack' is one of Benjamin Franklin's most charming creations. He delighted in cloaking his writing behind a variety of literary personas, and Richard Saunders remains one of his most beloved, although some critics have complained that Poor Richard reveals the shallow materialism at the heart of Franklin's homespun philosophy and, by extension, at the heart of America itself. The Almanack holds a central place in understanding Franklin and his evolution from humble tradesman to founding father as well as providing a look at colonial America.
  

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Review: Poor Richard's Almanack

User Review  - Ryan - Goodreads

The writing by Benjamin Franklin is great, but this book itself is bad. The printing on the pages are way off. This book was printed in China not America. I loved the writing but the book is bad. I recommend a different version. Read full review

Review: Poor Richard's Almanack

User Review  - Vincent Russo - Goodreads

Lots of very quotable snippets from Benjamin Franklin. These small nuggets of wisdom generally center around wealth, marriage, and frugality. Entertaining read, and many of these quotes are just as ... Read full review

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Page 5 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late, must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night. While Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...

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About the author (1987)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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