Jane Eyre

Front Cover
Trident Press International, Jun 1, 2000 - Fiction - 436 pages
127 Reviews
Initially published under the pseudonym Currer Bell in 1847, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre erupted onto the English literary scene, immediately winning the devotion of many of the world's most renowned writers, including William Makepeace Thackeray, who declared it a work "of great genius." Widely regarded as a revolutionary novel, Bronte's masterpiece introduced the world to a radical new type of heroine, one whose defiant virtue and moral courage departed sharply from the more acquiescent and malleable female characters of the day. Passionate, dramatic, and surprisingly modern, Jane Eyre endures as one of the world's most beloved novels. This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition includes newly written explanatory notes.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
75
4 stars
34
3 stars
12
2 stars
3
1 star
3

I was satisfied with the ending! - Goodreads
Each page shines in its prose. - Goodreads
The writing: seemingly simple but it is not. - Goodreads
And of course there's the perfect symmetry of the plot. - Goodreads
I adore 19th century writing for the most part. - LibraryThing
I'm a student and the notes saved me alot of research. - Overstock.com

Review: Jane Eyre

User Review  - Gunslingerdog - Goodreads

Back in high school, there were people reading this thick tome of a book called Jane Eyre that I saw being carried around even to PE classes. I wasn't in the class assigning this book, but I wondered ... Read full review

Review: Jane Eyre

User Review  - MJ Nicholls - Goodreads

Matchmaker profile: Jane Eyre Independent orphaned teenager seeks ill-tempered, unattractive landowner for theatrical squabbles and ice-cold nature walks. Must treat me with haughty contempt at first ... Read full review

Contents

How dare I Mrs Reed? How dare I? Because it is
30
I was mortally afraid of its trampling forefeet
107
What is it and who did it?he asked
140
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Charlotte Bronte, the third of six children, was born April 21, 1816, to the Reverend Patrick Bronte and Maria Branwell Bronte in Yorkshire, England. Along with her sisters, Emily and Anne, she produced some of the most impressive writings of the 19th century. The Brontes lived in a time when women used pseudonyms to conceal their female identity, hence Bronte's pseudonym, Currer Bell. Charlotte Bronte was only five when her mother died of cancer. In 1824, she and three of her sisters attended the Clergy Daughter's School in Cowan Bridge. The inspiration for the Lowood School in the classic Jane Eyre was formed by Bronte's experiences at the Clergy Daughter's School. Her two older sisters died of consumption because of the malnutrition and harsh treatment they suffered at the school. Charlotte and Emily Bronte returned home after the tragedy. The Bronte sisters fueled each other's creativity throughout their lives. As young children, they wrote long stories together about a complex imaginary kingdom they created from a set of wooden soldiers. In 1846, Charlotte Bronte, with her sisters Emily and Anne published a thin volume titled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. In the same year, Charlotte Bronte attempted to publish her novel, The Professor, but was rejected. One year later, she published Jane Eyre, which was instantly well received. Charlotte Bronte's life was touched by tragedy many times. Despite several proposals of marriage, she did not accept an offer until 1854 when she married the Reverend A. B. Nicholls. One year later, at the age of 39, she died of pneumonia while she was pregnant. Her previously rejected novel, The Professor, was published posthumously in 1857.

Bibliographic information