Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 90 (Google eBook)

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The Institution, 1887 - Civil engineering
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Page 428 - Sabbath nor the darkness of night were permitted to interrupt it. The workmen on the hulls were promised a handsome bonus in money for each one who stood steadfastly at the work until it was completed, and many thousands of dollars were thus gratuitously paid by Mr. Eads when it was finished. On the 12th of October, 1861, the first United States iron-clad, with her boilers and engines on board, was launched in Carondelet, Missouri, in forty-five days from the laying of her keel. She was named the...
Page 189 - ... barometric depressions ; but an investigation of existing data on this head led the Commissioners to the conclusion that much of the evidence, in support of the general application of this view, is untrustworthy, and that systematic observations, such as those compiled by the Government Inspectors of Mines, by the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, and other trustworthy authorities, practically established the absence of any general connection between colliery explosions...
Page 221 - Institution shall be considered the property thereof, unless there shall have been some previous arrangement to the contrary, and the Council may publish the same, in any way and at any time they may think proper. But should the Council refuse, or delay the publication of such Paper, beyond a reasonable time, the Author thereof shall have a right to copy the same, and to publish it as he may think fit, having previously given notice, in writing, to the Secretary of his intention. No person shall...
Page 427 - Be not surprised if you are called here suddenly by telegram. If called, come instantly. In a certain contingency it will be necessary to have the aid of the most thorough knowledge of our western rivers, and the use of steam on them, and in that event I have advised that you should be consulted.
Page 431 - IGads cenceived the idea of extending the Mississippi river, commercially speaking, into the Pacific Ocean, and of opening up to the eastern coast of Mexico and the States bordering on the Gulf and to the great valley of the Mississippi the rich markets of the Pacific, and at the same time to connect the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States by the shortest possible route by way of the Tehuantepec Isthmus, where a crossing for ships would effect a saving of 2,000 miles over the Panama...
Page 429 - Resolved, That we as practical engineers cannot conscientiously recommend to the parties in interest to venture upon the construction of spans of as great length as the maximum one prescribed by law " (500 feet). Mr. Eads however so clearly proved the correctness of his plans and showed that engineers of international reputation had designed even longer spans, which had been approved by their brother engineers, and that there were in existence at the time bridges whose spans were nearly equal to...
Page 220 - ... such a scale that they may be clearly visible, when suspended on the walls of the Theatre of the Institution, at the time of reading the communication...
Page 221 - Society, unless there shall have been any previous engagement with its author to the contrary ; and the Council may publish the same in any way and at any time that they may think proper. But should the Council refuse or...
Page 431 - ... of the House of Representatives on Interoceanic Canals, and replied: to Count de Lesseps, who was advocating the construction of the Panama Canal. In his remarks Mr. Eads explained, in considerable detail, his plans for a ship railway, and contended that it was entirely practicable. On August llth, 1880, he delivered an address before the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce on the " Interoceanic Ship Railway," in which he said: " Standing in your presence to-day, and conscious of the full import...
Page 428 - Louisville, Mound City, Cairo, and Pittsburg followed in rapid succession. An eighth vessel, larger, more powerful, and superior in every respect, was also undertaken before the hulls of the first seven had fairly assumed shape. In less than one hundred days one individual put in construction and completed...

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