Colonial Effects: The Making of National Identity in Jordan

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Columbia University Press, 2001 - History - 396 pages
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Colonial Effects analyzes the creation and definition of modern Jordanian identity. Massad studies two key institutions-- the law and the military--and uses them to create an original and precise analysis of the development of Jordanian national identity in the postcolonial period.

Joseph A. Massad engages recent scholarly debates on nationalism and richly fulfills the analytical promise of Michel Foucault's insight that modern institutions and their power to have productive, not merely repressive or coercive, capacities -- though Massad also stresses their continued repressive function.

His argument is advanced by a consideration of evidence, including images produced by state tourist agencies aimed at attracting Western visitors, the changing and precarious position of women in the newly constructed national space, and such practices as soccer games, music, songs, food, clothing, and shifting accents and dialects.

  

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Contents

Codifying the Nation Law and the Articulation of National Identity in Jordan
18
The Prehistory of Juridical Postcoloniality
22
National Time
25
National Space
33
National Territory and Paternity
35
Nationalizing Nonnationals
38
The Law Giveth and the Law Taketh Away
43
Women and Children
45
King Husayn and the Nationalist Officers
171
Glubb Pasha and the Uneasy King
178
Arabizing the Jordanian Arab Army
185
The End of an Era
189
Palace Repression and the Forgiving King
198
Palestinians and the Military
204
Threatening the Nations Masculinity and Religious Tradition
207
The Military and the New Jordan
213

Different Spaces as Different Times Law and Geography in Jordanian Nationalism
50
Women and Bedouins
51
Bedouins and National Citizenship
56
The Debate
66
Jordanian Culture in an International Frame
73
Women Between the Public and Private Spheres
79
Women in Public
88
Women and Politics
92
Cultural Syncretism or Colonial Mimic Men Jordans Bedouins and the Military Basis of National Identity
100
The Bedouin Choice
105
Cultural Imperialism and Discipline
111
Cultural Crossdressing as Epistemology
117
Imperialism as Educator
131
Masculinity Culture and Women
137
Transforming the Bedouins
143
Education Surveillance and the Production of Bedouin Culture
148
Nationalizing the Military Colonial Legacy as National Heritage
163
Anticolonial Nationalism and the Army
165
Colonial or National Legacy?
217
The Nation as an Elastic Entity The Expansion and Contraction of Jordan
222
The Road to Annexation
226
The Jericho Conference
227
The New Jordan
233
Palestinians and the West Bank
235
The PLO and Jordan
236
Toward Civil War
240
A New Nationalist Era
246
Asserting PostCivil War Jordanianness
250
The Road to The Severing of Ties
258
Who Is Jordanian?
263
Concluding Remarks
276
Notes
279
Works Cited
353
Index
371
Copyright

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Page 5 - It does this by dividing the world of social institutions and practices into two domains - the material and the spiritual. The material is the domain of the 'outside', of the economy and of statecraft, of science and technology, a domain where the West had proved its superiority and the East had succumbed. In this domain, then, Western superiority had to be acknowledged and its accomplishments carefully studied and replicated. The spiritual, on the other hand, is an 'inner' domain bearing the 'essential
Page 3 - ... historically" caused by the prestige (and consequent confidence) which the dominant group enjoys because of its position and function in the world of production. 2. The apparatus of state coercive power which "legally" enforces discipline on those groups who do not "consent" either actively or passively.
Page 3 - spontaneous" consent given by the great masses of the population to the general direction imposed on social life by the dominant fundamental group; this consent is "historically...
Page 2 - ... quarantine', to an indefinitely generalizable mechanism of 'panopticism'. Not because the disciplinary modality of power has replaced all the others; but because it has infiltrated the others, sometimes undermining them, but serving as an intermediary between them, linking them together, extending them and above all making it possible to bring the effects of power to the most minute and distant elements.

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About the author (2001)

Joseph A. Massad is assistant professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history in the Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. He won the Malcolm Kerr Dissertation Award for this work from the Middle East Studies Association.

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